Digging up a Cordyline

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DiCasS
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Digging up a Cordyline

Post by DiCasS » Mon Aug 19, 2013 11:44 am

From what I've read I don't think these have a very good survival rate if transplanted due to them having a long taproot, but there's one I have here which I'd like to try. A bit different to my others and have very wide leaves in comparison. I'd even be happy if it sent out new shoots if the parent died. It's not very big, a few inches of trunk and probably stands only about 3ft tallish. What do you think the chances are of me getting offshoots from it???

Thanks

Di
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Blairs
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by Blairs » Mon Aug 19, 2013 2:13 pm

From moving a few long taproot plants (not cordyline), survival depends on:

how much taproot can be kept intact when moving the plant
how heavy the soil is (light soil can allow you to pull all of the root out, very heavy can mean that the root is potbound to being so heavy you lose most of the taproot)
how long the plant has been there and hence how much root is there

I found that excavating as much soil as possible and then soaking the soil around the tap root and then pulling it can give you the whole thing.
Last edited by Blairs on Mon Aug 19, 2013 3:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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DiCasS
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by DiCasS » Mon Aug 19, 2013 2:52 pm

Thanks Blairs. I planted this plant quite a few years ago, I lost growth in 2010 Winter and this is a new plant that has come up. The soil is quite good where its planted - its not clay/claggy at all and very easy to work. I've got no idea how much root to expect since its been there a few years. Although it don't look like it on the pic, I would say the leaves are probably coming on for twice the width of my other Cordylines I'm growing here, hence me wanting to save this, or at least getting to have a new growth if the main stem dies.
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Di
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Blairs
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by Blairs » Mon Aug 19, 2013 3:11 pm

I moved some large Cardoons last year - came up in one with the wet saturated soil that last years rains afforded and have tried the soak and gently pull on other plants since. Weakness is you tend to pull off the thin feeder roots and that seems to cause wilting and defoliation in some plants.

Am guessing your Cordyline will have quite an established root system so the old dig around deep and wide comes to mind, perhaps using a hose to loosen the soil at the bottom?


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DiCasS
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by DiCasS » Mon Aug 19, 2013 3:50 pm

I'll do that then when the time comes then Blairs. Houseleeks have invaded all around the trunk acting as groundcover, so will leave as many of those as I can when I remove it. I've got some quite large (deep) bags, like a reinforced plastic weave, with handles, which I'm planning to keep it in until I can replant. I'm guessing will be out of the ground about a month.

Cheers

Di
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brendan
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by brendan » Mon Aug 19, 2013 4:14 pm

Di
I moved one of my Cordyline Australis about two years ago it had just under 2 foot of trunk. As I had time before I needed to move it I cut a circle with a spade all the way round the plant about a foot away from the trunk I then left It a couple of months to give it time to produce new fiborous roots around the plant while surviving off the deep tap root underneath.I then dug it up severing the roots underneath to get it out and then tansplanted it to its new spot where it slowly carried on with no ill effect.
Cordylines don't transplant well if big but considering the size of yours you may get away with it depending on how long you have before you have to move it.Im not saying this is the best way to do it but it worked for me.


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kracker
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by kracker » Tue Aug 20, 2013 6:25 am

I had to move one 3 weeks ago to put some decking down it's been there for about 8 years but had lost the big one in the big freeze 2010/2011 so the one to move the pup about 3ft and romping away ,after a few days the lower half leaves went brown but does seem to be recovering there is growth coming through icon_cheers
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DiCasS
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by DiCasS » Wed Aug 21, 2013 7:03 pm

Sorry about the delay in replying.
brendan wrote:Di
I moved one of my Cordyline Australis about two years ago it had just under 2 foot of trunk. As I had time before I needed to move it I cut a circle with a spade all the way round the plant about a foot away from the trunk I then left It a couple of months to give it time to produce new fiborous roots around the plant while surviving off the deep tap root underneath.I then dug it up severing the roots underneath to get it out and then tansplanted it to its new spot where it slowly carried on with no ill effect.
Cordylines don't transplant well if big but considering the size of yours you may get away with it depending on how long you have before you have to move it.Im not saying this is the best way to do it but it worked for me.
I've got a bit of time Brendan so after thought will try this method. I'd heard about cutting around the plant for palms but didn't know whether it would work with Cordyline, (palms will be done at the same time). I'm only going to move this one and want to give it the best chance its got, fingers crossed it will work for me too. Each of my other Cordylines sent up multiple new plants, this one only sent the one.

Good news on yours Kracker icon_cheers Even if my main plant dies I would be really pleased for a new shoot but to keep the Mother would be a real bonus.

Thanks

Di
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kracker
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by kracker » Wed Aug 21, 2013 8:41 pm

DiCasS wrote:Sorry about the delay in replying.
brendan wrote:Di
I moved one of my Cordyline Australis about two years ago it had just under 2 foot of trunk. As I had time before I needed to move it I cut a circle with a spade all the way round the plant about a foot away from the trunk I then left It a couple of months to give it time to produce new fiborous roots around the plant while surviving off the deep tap root underneath.I then dug it up severing the roots underneath to get it out and then tansplanted it to its new spot where it slowly carried on with no ill effect.
Cordylines don't transplant well if big but considering the size of yours you may get away with it depending on how long you have before you have to move it.Im not saying this is the best way to do it but it worked for me.
I've got a bit of time Brendan so after thought will try this method. I'd heard about cutting around the plant for palms but didn't know whether it would work with Cordyline, (palms will be done at the same time). I'm only going to move this one and want to give it the best chance its got, fingers crossed it will work for me too. Each of my other Cordylines sent up multiple new plants, this one only sent the one.

Good news on yours Kracker icon_cheers Even if my main plant dies I would be really pleased for a new shoot but to keep the Mother would be a real bonus.

Thanks

Di
My neighbour has a spit for digging post holes so i got in deep and broad and good root watering daily so although no means is it big but has history :lol: so fingers crossed !
Poloticians and nappies should both be changed regularly for the same reason !


greendragon
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by greendragon » Fri Aug 23, 2013 11:51 am

Well my mother had a double trunked coryline in a pot, we cut the rootball right down the middle and a year later we now have 2 healthy cordylines, I think they can survive root disturbance quite well.
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by jungle jas » Fri Aug 23, 2013 12:49 pm

Di, I Have moved three over the last few years, all have survived, but they do sulk and take a long time to get going again. Just dig deep and get as much root as you can. icon_thumright
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by fern Rob » Fri Aug 23, 2013 4:31 pm

I lost one of my Cordylines but winter 2010 I think contributed.
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Nathan
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by Nathan » Fri Aug 23, 2013 10:57 pm

greendragon wrote:Well my mother had a double trunked coryline in a pot, we cut the rootball right down the middle and a year later we now have 2 healthy cordylines, I think they can survive root disturbance quite well.
Yes in a pot they are not going to have a long tap root...

Small-ish Cordylines may be able to be transplanted, but anything with a proper trunk is going to be a no no...
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DiCasS
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by DiCasS » Sat Aug 24, 2013 8:30 am

Thanks muchly guys. It's good to hear of some successful transplants. I may as well try, as the next guy owning my garden wants all lawn and this will be in the way, so no doubt he'll dig it up and dump it. Fingers crossed it hasn't got attitude. All good tips and taken on board.

Thanks.

Di
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dorothy
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Re: Digging up a Cordyline

Post by dorothy » Wed Aug 28, 2013 8:54 pm

Well just to let you know, I moved one early this year, and I think it is slowly dying :( the bottom leaves are slowly browning all the way up the trunk :(


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