Guerrilla gardening

Blairs

Re: Guerrilla gardening

Post by Blairs » Sun Nov 17, 2013 6:53 pm

Guerrilla gardening is about improving a previously denuded area. Improving it improves the lives of many. A Fatsia I sowed a few years ago is still growing away in a public road verge - my guess is a lot of people walk past with no idea what the plant with the large leaves is but as long as they think it improves the area then fine.

Mr List

Re: Guerrilla gardening

Post by Mr List » Sun Nov 17, 2013 8:44 pm

I was just thinking it would be great if I lived in an area with those patches of grass in the wide pavements so I could do some guerrilla gardening.

grub

Re: Guerrilla gardening

Post by grub » Sun Nov 17, 2013 9:30 pm

You'll always run a risk though... :( http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/scot ... southseeds

jungle jas

Re: Guerrilla gardening

Post by jungle jas » Mon Nov 18, 2013 12:06 am

Mr List wrote:I was just thinking it would be great if I lived in an area with those patches of grass in the wide pavements so I could do some guerrilla gardening.
Your time will come. icon_thumright

Troppoz

Re: Guerrilla gardening

Post by Troppoz » Mon Nov 18, 2013 8:04 am

Good to see so many comrades! icon_thumright

I never plant on private property. Well OK maybe there was this one time...but apart from that all my plantings are roadside verge or local parkland. I think roadside planting with trees and shrubs vital because it gives wildlife green corridors to move around in as different plants flower and fruit, plus it also gives shade and amenity to what is otherwise a hot asphalt and brick environment. Our council doesnt seem to want to take too much advantage of our climate and their planting efforts (or lack thereof) really dont do Darwin justice. Other tropical cities in Australia like Townsville and Cairns have amazing tropical roadside plantings, you are in no doubt you are in the tropics. Darwin looks like its still half scrub in places :? So I defend anyone who steps up and plants up communal areas, its can only be a good thing icon_thumright
miketropic wrote:how hardy are those figs? doubt there good over here in my areas since I've never seen any
Mike Ive seen Ficus macrophylla and F. elastica growing as impressive trees in Hobart, but I doubt they could take your location. There are some native America banyans from around Florida that might take some cold like F. aurea and F. citrifolia
GREVILLE wrote:Old habits die hard, Sean. icon_thumright I seem to remember you were doing this last year. You'll get that rain forest up and running yet :mrgreen:
I try to plant a few every year. Im limited to how many I can carry buckets of water to for their first dry season so about 6 is maximum per year. Yep Ill get that rainforest up before long, thats if the "gentlemen" on mowers dont get there first...

timj17
Posts: 27
Joined: Sun Jun 02, 2013 9:54 pm
Location: Totnes

Re: Guerrilla gardening

Post by timj17 » Mon Nov 18, 2013 9:44 am

On the subject of Waggie seeds, I recently bought 1000 from rarepalmseeds and they started sprouting after about 2 weeks at room temperature, and near 100% germination now.

I am selling some excess seeds, if you are interested in any you can message me.

multim

Re: Guerrilla gardening

Post by multim » Mon Nov 18, 2013 10:06 am

'People' are funny things.
Last year, my local council planted many thousands of pounds worth of trees in my area. The residents objected, complained and the tree were removed. Some ornamental cherry trees remained. A day before the strong winds were forecast last month, the tree-ties were mysteriously cut and the supporting stakes kicked over. Now I'm not a guerrilla gardener but I took exception to this and replaced the stakes and ties so the trees weathered the storm.
Good job done, even if I did get the 'cold shoulder' from some people!

Troppoz

Re: Guerrilla gardening

Post by Troppoz » Mon Nov 18, 2013 11:44 pm

multim wrote:'People' are funny things.
Last year, my local council planted many thousands of pounds worth of trees in my area. The residents objected, complained and the tree were removed. Some ornamental cherry trees remained. A day before the strong winds were forecast last month, the tree-ties were mysteriously cut and the supporting stakes kicked over. Now I'm not a guerrilla gardener but I took exception to this and replaced the stakes and ties so the trees weathered the storm.
Good job done, even if I did get the 'cold shoulder' from some people!
Good work soldier! icon_salut icon_thumleft

For the life of me though I cant understand why anyone would oppose tree plantings?? icon_scratch

Deedee

Re: Guerrilla gardening

Post by Deedee » Tue Nov 19, 2013 6:03 am

Hi Sean icon_cheers It depends what tree's are planted, Where i live there are huge trees planted from past councils, far too big for small front and back gardens, allso in front of homes on small strips of land which cause shade and a heck of a lot of leaf fall in autumn, they are butt ugly trees to boot :D some had honey fungus about 4 years ago and were cut down, i bet some of those tennants were clapping there hands that day, i think the council now have it right and are planting smaller trees which look good and are better for the enviroment if the local kids give them a chance to grow that is icon_rambo

Keep up the good work icon_thumleft

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