Visit to Brazil

otorongo
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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by otorongo » Wed Jan 29, 2014 2:57 pm

I've seen conifers on the hills outside of Rio Bonito, RJ, in the more open-space areas.

Portuguese is one of the easiest languages to learn.


Nigel
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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by Nigel » Wed Jan 29, 2014 5:09 pm

They grow Pinus all over Brazil in the hills for pulp , they are everywhere, but an ornamental conifer in the hot humid belt is something else.
Portuguese language I learnt very well, I wouldnt say it was easy, the verbs are hellish, but I am sure a lot of languages are much worse to learn. Pronunciation is another matter altogether. I can at times speak perfect portuguese without being understood. Likewise some of the dialects are very difficult, one person I can understand perfectly, the next I can understand absolutely nothing, and yet they are speaking the same language.
To learn portuguese is one thing, the combination of the language and pronunciation at times makes it very difficult.
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otorongo
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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by otorongo » Wed Jan 29, 2014 5:29 pm

Yes, the multitude of dialects and accents in Brazil can make communication tricky. Their spoken language, especially in the rural areas, can differ quite a lot from the official Portuguese you learn from the books or hear on TV.
It was the latter I was referring to as one of the easiest languages to learn.


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Yorkshire Kris
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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by Yorkshire Kris » Wed Jan 29, 2014 5:58 pm

Nigel wrote:
Alexander wrote:
Well palmtrees is a bit differend I would say...

Alexander
Not really, they dont have conifers, in Florianopolis they will pay a fortune for an ugly and half dead conifer struggling to live through a hot humid summer , to me its insane. Buxus at least seems to survive the heat
We want palm trees, they want conifers.
Perhaps you should change your business model and put it into reverse: Sell buxus and conifers to the Brazilians!


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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by Nigel » Wed Jan 29, 2014 7:37 pm

Yorkshire Kris wrote:
Nigel wrote:
Alexander wrote:
Well palmtrees is a bit differend I would say...

Alexander
Not really, they dont have conifers, in Florianopolis they will pay a fortune for an ugly and half dead conifer struggling to live through a hot humid summer , to me its insane. Buxus at least seems to survive the heat
We want palm trees, they want conifers.
Perhaps you should change your business model and put it into reverse: Sell buxus and conifers to the Brazilians!
LOL Kris, they are all trying to do that already in the cool mountains where this stuff will grow. They grow these god awful Podocarpus ,never seen such ugly plants and they sell like hotcakes for a fortune.
They have literally thousands of nurseries across the mountains pumping out millions of plants that go daily in trucks to sao Paulo, Rio and Brasilia. It is HUGE business.
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Yorkshire Kris
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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by Yorkshire Kris » Wed Jan 29, 2014 7:50 pm

Nigel wrote:LOL Kris, they are all trying to do that already in the cool mountains where this stuff will grow. They grow these god awful Podocarpus ,never seen such ugly plants and they sell like hotcakes for a fortune.
They have literally thousands of nurseries across the mountains pumping out millions of plants that go daily in trucks to sao Paulo, Rio and Brasilia. It is HUGE business.
I was thinking about getting one :lol:

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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by Nigel » Wed Jan 29, 2014 10:20 pm

Yeah but there is beautiful and there is ugly ........
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Alexander
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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by Alexander » Thu Jan 30, 2014 2:48 am

Nigel wrote:
Alexander wrote:
Well palmtrees is a bit differend I would say...

Alexander
Not really, they dont have conifers, in Florianopolis they will pay a fortune for an ugly and half dead conifer struggling to live through a hot humid summer , to me its insane. Buxus at least seems to survive the heat
We want palm trees, they want conifers.
They have Auracaria angustifolia though. Well there are some conifers you can grow in tropical climates. I have seen them in Malaysia and Indonesia.

What I also did notice that the most common Yucca in Brasil is Y. filamentosa.

Well do not forget that Brasilian lanscape architect, Roberto Burle Marx whom used a lot of native plants in his designs.

P.S. Conifers and Buxus are and where also qieut populair in the Low Countries. But here lots of folks have no imagination anyway...

Alexander


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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by Nigel » Thu Jan 30, 2014 8:09 am

Alexander, yes its interesting about native plants, you have Trithirinax acanthacoma that grows to perfection in the mountains of Brazil and trachycarpus fortunei, that grows very well, but never attains the beauty of the Trithrinax. They are both called `buriti` to the locals. Everybody has a `buriti` in their garden, but what do they buy ? You guessed it they buy Trachycarpus.
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otorongo
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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by otorongo » Thu Jan 30, 2014 9:25 am

Non-native is always more attractive to people.
Last edited by otorongo on Fri Jan 31, 2014 11:11 am, edited 1 time in total.


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Exotic Life
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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by Exotic Life » Fri Jan 31, 2014 10:19 am

Nice pictures Nigel. Some awesome hybrids over there.


Alexander
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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by Alexander » Fri Jan 31, 2014 11:31 am

Nigel wrote:Alexander, yes its interesting about native plants, you have Trithirinax acanthacoma that grows to perfection in the mountains of Brazil and trachycarpus fortunei, that grows very well, but never attains the beauty of the Trithrinax. They are both called `buriti` to the locals. Everybody has a `buriti` in their garden, but what do they buy ? You guessed it they buy Trachycarpus.
Well in Musyari they call every palm takil. phoenix loureii or T. takil its all the same to the locals there.

So you have it in more parts of the World.

Alexander


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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by sanatic1234 » Fri Jan 31, 2014 11:36 am

Nigel wrote: Sanatic, no, I wasnt near the amazon, its too hot for me. The atlantic rainforest though is pretty interesting, I wish I could get my hands on some Dicksonia sellowiana , where there is land clearance they burn them because they are prohibitied for export.
.
No way! what a waste of a living tree fern! You would think they would replant them somewhere at least. :(
Last edited by sanatic1234 on Fri Jan 31, 2014 3:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Best regards Aaron :)

Summer 2013 was a good one :-).

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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by Nigel » Fri Jan 31, 2014 2:51 pm

Alexander wrote:
Nigel wrote:Alexander, yes its interesting about native plants, you have Trithirinax acanthacoma that grows to perfection in the mountains of Brazil and trachycarpus fortunei, that grows very well, but never attains the beauty of the Trithrinax. They are both called `buriti` to the locals. Everybody has a `buriti` in their garden, but what do they buy ? You guessed it they buy Trachycarpus.
Well in Musyari they call every palm takil. phoenix loureii or T. takil its all the same to the locals there.

So you have it in more parts of the World.

Alexander
Alexander , palmeira is palm, the different palms all have local names given by indians, Butia ( botanic name taken from indians name) ) , buriti ( trithrinax acanthacoma) , Indaia ( attalea) , Jeriva ( syagrus rom) , but because Trachycarpus resembles trithrinax everybody calls it buriti so it has same name as the local palm.
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nige pook
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Re: Visit to Brazil

Post by nige pook » Fri Jan 31, 2014 6:37 pm

Nigel wrote:
Alexander wrote:
Nigel wrote:Alexander, yes its interesting about native plants, you have Trithirinax acanthacoma that grows to perfection in the mountains of Brazil and trachycarpus fortunei, that grows very well, but never attains the beauty of the Trithrinax. They are both called `buriti` to the locals. Everybody has a `buriti` in their garden, but what do they buy ? You guessed it they buy Trachycarpus.
Well in Musyari they call every palm takil. phoenix loureii or T. takil its all the same to the locals there.

So you have it in more parts of the World.

Alexander
Alexander , palmeira is palm, the different palms all have local names given by indians, Butia ( botanic name taken from indians name) ) , buriti ( trithrinax acanthacoma) , Indaia ( attalea) , Jeriva ( syagrus rom) , but because Trachycarpus resembles trithrinax everybody calls it buriti so it has same name as the local palm.
Guess its like the way we hear English folk referring to palms when they are looking at cordylines or worse phormiums! Its us pleeks,sorry enthusiasts,who take the time to research and learn the proper names and varieties lol.:-)
Nige


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