CHAMAEROPS HUMILIS var MACROCARPA

David York
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Re: CHAMAEROPS HUMILIS var MACROCARPA

Post by David York » Sat Mar 22, 2014 7:29 pm

Thanks GB for your comments. A little surprised though to hear that you studied ancient and modern languages - did you actually finish the course?

Back to the topic, a dear friend of mine and EPS member, who used to hail from Italy, but now relocated to Australia, and one of the foremost authorities on the species Chamaerops, Massimo Cola (Max to his friends), sent me different forms of Chamaerops from his extensive collection, including 'Macrocarpa' and 'Microcarpa'. The leaf size on these two variants are fairly similar, though there are differences in the number of pinnae, and also the stiffness of the leaflet.

Chamaerops forms are quite numerous and diverse. My current collection includes, amongst others, 'Conduplicata', 'Tenuifrons', 'Cerifera' (Argentea) Fine Leaved Form, 'Arborescens', various forms of this, plus numerous others. I am a keen collector of the genus Chamaerops, and I currently grow several uncommonly seen forms. this is my favourite genus, after Trachycarpus, of which I have many different forms too.
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GoggleboxUK
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Re: CHAMAEROPS HUMILIS var MACROCARPA

Post by GoggleboxUK » Sun Mar 23, 2014 1:41 am

David York wrote:Thanks GB for your comments. A little surprised though to hear that you studied ancient and modern languages - did you actually finish the course?
First class honours, thanks for asking. Let me know if I can help you with anything else you might not know.
David York wrote:Back to the topic, a dear friend of mine and EPS member, who used to hail from Italy, but now relocated to Australia, and one of the foremost authorities on the species Chamaerops, Massimo Cola (Max to his friends), sent me different forms of Chamaerops from his extensive collection, including 'Macrocarpa' and 'Microcarpa'. The leaf size on these two variants are fairly similar, though there are differences in the number of pinnae, and also the stiffness of the leaflet.
So you've been communicating with an Italian man and talking about stiff ness? OK. Awkward.
David York wrote:Chamaerops forms are quite numerous and diverse. My current collection includes, amongst others, 'Conduplicata', 'Tenuifrons', 'Cerifera' (Argentea) Fine Leaved Form, 'Arborescens', various forms of this, plus numerous others. I am a keen collector of the genus Chamaerops, and I currently grow several uncommonly seen forms. this is my favourite genus, after Trachycarpus, of which I have many different forms too.
Bold claims. Please provide photos of yourself with each of the different species in your uncommon collection so we can all see you're not just someone who likes to blow hot air at forums. Might I suggest you hold a large piece of card with the name of each varieant written on it in large black letters and a passphrase so we can verify the truth of your claim, I suggest "Nevergoingtohappen".

Alternatively, start a blog and show us pictures of your garden over the years, like the rest of us do here.

And lighten up.
Once upon a time there were 3 little bears. Now there's thousands of them.


Rob S
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Re: CHAMAEROPS HUMILIS var MACROCARPA

Post by Rob S » Sun Mar 23, 2014 3:06 pm

GoggleboxUK wrote:
David York wrote:Thanks GB for your comments. A little surprised though to hear that you studied ancient and modern languages - did you actually finish the course?
First class honours, thanks for asking. Let me know if I can help you with anything else you might not know.
David York wrote:Back to the topic, a dear friend of mine and EPS member, who used to hail from Italy, but now relocated to Australia, and one of the foremost authorities on the species Chamaerops, Massimo Cola (Max to his friends), sent me different forms of Chamaerops from his extensive collection, including 'Macrocarpa' and 'Microcarpa'. The leaf size on these two variants are fairly similar, though there are differences in the number of pinnae, and also the stiffness of the leaflet.
So you've been communicating with an Italian man and talking about stiff ness? OK. Awkward.
David York wrote:Chamaerops forms are quite numerous and diverse. My current collection includes, amongst others, 'Conduplicata', 'Tenuifrons', 'Cerifera' (Argentea) Fine Leaved Form, 'Arborescens', various forms of this, plus numerous others. I am a keen collector of the genus Chamaerops, and I currently grow several uncommonly seen forms. this is my favourite genus, after Trachycarpus, of which I have many different forms too.
Bold claims. Please provide photos of yourself with each of the different species in your uncommon collection so we can all see you're not just someone who likes to blow hot air at forums. Might I suggest you hold a large piece of card with the name of each varieant written on it in large black letters and a passphrase so we can verify the truth of your claim, I suggest "Nevergoingtohappen".

Alternatively, start a blog and show us pictures of your garden over the years, like the rest of us do here.

And lighten up.
:lol:


Conifers
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Re: CHAMAEROPS HUMILIS var MACROCARPA

Post by Conifers » Sun Mar 23, 2014 3:46 pm

GoggleboxUK wrote:Trachycarpus, hmmm...

Rough Fruit:

[ Image ]

Rough branches:

[ Image ]

Now I'm not saying it's obvious but...
Sorry, but Trachycarpus does mean 'rough fruit' - whatever modern corruptions of language might do, remember we're dealing with traditional usage, as Hermann Wendland was familiar with when he described the genus in 1861 icon_thumright

Without having struggled through Wendland's French and Latin to see if he gives a derivation himself, for a guess I'd suggest he was examining dried fruit on a herbarium specimen imported from China or Japan, which would be wrinkled and thus 'rough'.


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Dave Brown
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Re: CHAMAEROPS HUMILIS var MACROCARPA

Post by Dave Brown » Sun Mar 23, 2014 5:25 pm

ok enough of the squabbling.

You can't always believe everything you read on the web, but I just looked this up and says Latin word Trachycarpus_ is derived from Greek word Trachus, so you are both right.... It is Latin but originally from Greek.
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GoggleboxUK
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Re: CHAMAEROPS HUMILIS var MACROCARPA

Post by GoggleboxUK » Sun Mar 23, 2014 6:52 pm

Yes, I'm both right.

:lol:
Once upon a time there were 3 little bears. Now there's thousands of them.


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