The Best of... A discussion thread

Daftattitude
Posts: 5
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2018 12:54 pm
Location: Norwich, Norfolk, UK

The Best of... A discussion thread

Post by Daftattitude » Sun Jan 05, 2020 6:05 pm

I have the usual core plants of bamboo, tetrapanex, fatsias japonica and spidersweb, ferns and of course a few trachycarpus.

My partner Rebekah has Lillie's interspersed throughout the garden to add a flowery feminine touch.

We usually grow ricinus each year, as well as tithonia but will probably skip that this year.

I'm going to try Kangaroo Apple, brugmansia and cleome this year for something different.

(Not good with the spelling of plant names so sorry about mistakes)

chainsaw kid
Posts: 252
Joined: Wed Jun 20, 2018 12:00 pm
Location: ll39 1bjArthog

The Best of... A discussion thread

Post by chainsaw kid » Mon Jan 06, 2020 9:03 am

Daftattitude wrote:
Sun Jan 05, 2020 6:05 pm
(Not good with the spelling of plant names so sorry about mistakes)
Don't worry about spelling, I am badly dyslexic so know your problems, :roll: Hooray for modern technology (spell checker). :lol: At least you are contrebuting. icon_thumright
Last edited by chainsaw kid on Mon Mar 02, 2020 12:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Don't Just sit there, plant something!

The Kid.

elge_onion
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2018 8:48 am
Location: Mastin Moor

The Best of... A discussion thread

Post by elge_onion » Tue Jan 21, 2020 5:06 pm

Core
I suppose are pretty similar to everyone's

Musa basjoo... I'm on a really windy site so I don't want too much height so I let mine get knocked back to the ground every year.
Clematis armandii... Huge strap like leaves that provide a tropicalish looking back drop.. plus the early flowers really give me a boost to get outside gardening.
Trachycarpus waggy....purchased from Nigel a couple of years ago.... It's perfect

Special
I suppose my specia plants are my house plants that go outside for the summer.
Monstera deliciosa. Goes out late April and comes back in mid sept. Can withstand some low temps
Rhipsalis .. I'm going to try some of these outside this year.

Wish list
My wishlist is full of house plants
Monstera del. Thai constellation
Monstera standleyana
Rhaphidophora tetrasperma
Mind like Poison Ivy.... body like Grotbags[i[/i]

elge_onion
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2018 8:48 am
Location: Mastin Moor

The Best of... A discussion thread

Post by elge_onion » Tue Jan 21, 2020 5:08 pm

Core
I suppose are pretty similar to everyone's

Musa basjoo... I'm on a really windy site so I don't want too much height so I let mine get knocked back to the ground every year.
Clematis armandii... Huge strap like leaves that provide a tropicalish looking back drop.. plus the early flowers really give me a boost to get outside gardening.
Trachycarpus waggy....purchased from Nigel a couple of years ago.... It's perfect

Special
I suppose my specia plants are my house plants that go outside for the summer.
Monstera deliciosa. Goes out late April and comes back in mid sept. Can withstand some low temps
Rhipsalis .. I'm going to try some of these outside this year.

Wish list
My wishlist is full of house plants
Monstera del. Thai constellation
Monstera standleyana
Rhaphidophora tetrasperma
Mind like Poison Ivy.... body like Grotbags[i[/i]

Josh
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Mar 18, 2019 7:15 pm
Location: Poole, Dorset

The Best of... A discussion thread

Post by Josh » Wed Jan 22, 2020 11:54 pm

This is my first winter exotic Gardening so can't really comment. But going by what has done well over the last year I would say definitely Bananas. My Musa Yunnanensis and Cheesemani both Doubled in size. My Basjoo barely put on 10cm but has started to grow already along with my Sikkimensis. My fastest growing palm is Trachycarpus Nanus, 7 or so new leaves last year and it is still pushing them out now. As is my Phoenix canariensis_CIDP, Queen palm and Sabal Yapa that have actually grown bigger over the past three months, despite the Yapa and Queen palm being no more than a few youngish leaves. Cordyline is an easy backbone for any exotic, but where I live they're so ubiquitous, found even growing feral near industrial areas that they loose their exotic appeal, in the right circumstances they could get established 'wild' down here on the South coast, some good 4/5m trees in parks, gardens and the middles of roundabouts
A surprising one that I have enjoyed is my £3 Wilko spider plant, it has quadrupled over summer in full sun, with barely any frost damage at all, still green. It was a prolific flowerer, and is bigger than my Mum's variegated 15 year old one she has in her downstairs toilet that I have two cuttings from.

Thomas
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Mar 01, 2020 12:57 pm
Location: Oxford, UK

The Best of... A discussion thread

Post by Thomas » Sun Mar 01, 2020 5:31 pm

Just joined but depends on the atmosphere you wish to create. I tend to loosely group plants according to geography and situation in garden. Bamboos give structure and height within a few years so this is where I start.

Himalayan forest (semi shaded and moist, near large trees): blue columned bamboo (Borinda), Pteris wallachiana, pleione, schefflera (any hardy species), arisaemas (mine mostly died due to wet, not cold winters.

Japan/China (sun - semi shade, not too dry, pond fits well in my opinion): Phylostachys bambusoides (any, I like marliacea, tanakae or mixta), Phyllostachys vivax (any form, I like the yellow ones: aureocaulis or huangwenzhu inversa, maybe offset by huanwenzhu), then for Japan some white pines and Japanese maples, for China Acer griseum, some trachycarpus)

Latin America (sun, dry’ish, rock garden type): chusqueas (gigatea is in flower, but culeou variants or Montana), hardy bromeliads (some have luck with puya), agaves, berberis, luma apiculata, jubaea chilensis, araucaria angustifolia or good old araucana.

chainsaw kid
Posts: 252
Joined: Wed Jun 20, 2018 12:00 pm
Location: ll39 1bjArthog

The Best of... A discussion thread

Post by chainsaw kid » Mon Mar 02, 2020 12:22 pm

chainsaw kid wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 9:11 pm
Plants I would not be with out.
Acacia baileyana (purple form). The most beautiful tree for flowering in the winter with the advantage of purple leaves in the growing season.
I have had rain and howling wind for weeks, as have the rest of you, Apart from the fence blowing down 3 times, due to be changed in the spring, I have had one of the main branches of my flowering Acacia snapped off in the gales. This has spoiled the shape completely! I am really P----- off with that. :roll: icon_thumbdown
Don't Just sit there, plant something!

The Kid.

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