trachycarpus manipur

pipster 12
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trachycarpus manipur

Post by pipster 12 » Sat Mar 09, 2013 4:12 pm

I dont mean to nit pick as I love trying to get away with new species of palms in the uk-we must trial new species here. I am new to this board but not new to exotic gardening.

Have been growing palms for years with much trial and error. Have read reports about trachycarpus manipur-being extremely frost hardy. I have lost a seedling already (thought I would give it some fresh air and left it out in -3C in error) and thought I would try a bigger palm about 2 foot high. Just read a detailed report of where it naturally grows in habitat-

8 months of hot summer-temps can reach 100 degrees farenheit, around 4 months of cool sunny winters with lows of 30F (-1 Degrees C).

Who thought this plant would be hardy here? To be honest it gets described as super hardy- "the next big thing". I do wish nurseries would be more honest with their information so that we can at least know when to protect the palms we buy from them. After all they are costly.

from what I can gather-they don't like damp but can take some cold when bigger. If any one has some success stories? be interested to know.

phil


gabriel
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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by gabriel » Sat Mar 09, 2013 4:26 pm

I have planted out a small tiddler 2 years ago.
Zero protection and it is looking very good, not a scratch..
So for for me they prove to be hardy.


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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by GoggleboxUK » Sat Mar 09, 2013 4:30 pm

I've got a 4ft potted one with about 6" of trunk that I intend to plant out in a sheltered spot this spring.
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pipster 12
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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by pipster 12 » Sat Mar 09, 2013 5:22 pm

I know my original post came across a bit negative but sometimes you cant help but get a bit cynical to all the suggestions of hardiness. I once got talking to a guy in cornwall who had lost that many plants -even the slightest suggestion of trying an experimental species sent him in a rage-he became the angriest man alive! suppose you do get cynical when spending so much money on potential failures.

Trachycarpus latisectus -sold to me as mega hardy-I now know -7 is its limit and it does far better in a sunny dry location in winter.

as does sabal species. Had some totally undamaged under my veranda through the last few winters which got to -12c in my front garden.

good to see it shows some promise -I will grow mine on in the greenhouse to give it the best chance.

glad to see all yours are doing well!


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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by Dave Brown » Sat Mar 09, 2013 7:22 pm

I do not have a Manipur, but in general palms have to be grown cool to be at their most hardy. If your seedling was used to tropics type temperatures then it would not have grown to handle -3C. I've heard Trachycarpus fortunei dies in -10C in the New Oleans area, as they grow never having had a cold freeze.

I think most people grow for maximum speed from seed rather than maximum hardiness, as they are slower.
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pipster 12
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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by pipster 12 » Sat Mar 09, 2013 8:10 pm

Completely agree Dave,

plants must be hardened and have to adapt to our climate. That's another thing about manipur it is slow compared to other Trachycarpus's. Bought two seedlings from canarius a couple of years ago. One T manipur/one trachycarpus princeps golden lotus (blue one).

Manipur did not shift and I think I have killed it this year (in error) the princeps has trebled in size since I got it. Not just that dave -it doesn't look the most attractive palm compared to my takil, princeps and princeps hybride .

The princeps hybride is stunning it actually looks better than my actual princeps. The leaves are glossy mid green above and powdery blue below (as in princeps white/ blue). All the leaves look neatly manicured and very evenly spaced. I got that from mypalmshop in holland.

the recently bought larger manipur is a bit like a large chamaerops at present.

that's just my opinion though

there is only one reason I would want to grow a slow plant
if its really stunning and totally hardy

phil
Last edited by pipster 12 on Sat Mar 09, 2013 8:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.


pipster 12
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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by pipster 12 » Sat Mar 09, 2013 8:15 pm

Is there any way to upload photos on here dave? of the princeps hybride?

kind regards
phil


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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by redsquirrel » Sat Mar 09, 2013 8:51 pm

totally agree about manipurs being pussies when smaller,i lost a load i picked up from the mulu auction years ago.all but one from 21 snuffed it.that one doesnt look like a manipur to me.George at the palmhouse had some belters growing down there,stunning almost white undersides to leaves which to me resembled a more 'v; shaped princeps leaf the way they were formed
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pipster 12
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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by pipster 12 » Sat Mar 09, 2013 9:17 pm

Yes you could be right-I wonder if there's 3 or 4 actual species or variants being sold under "manipur"

I grow a lot of cacti too. There's a few like this

example : coryphantha vivipara one species but with many variations. It is widespread throughout the US
from mexico to canada


One that grows in canada and at this latitude! cold to -40c and wet........ c. vivipara var vivipara

its both cold and damp hardy-grows in a rockery here in the uk.

all other variants (good example c vivipara var arizonica) come from baking dry deserts.

The point I am making although plants can look the same/similar - cultivation wise they couldn't be more different.

Getting back to manipur is there a few stands of these palms in radically different environments? Saw on rare palm seeds a higher altitude form of t. latisectus (sikhim form). This could explain the mixed reports

And to agree with redsquirrel I have seen much variation in form too. Some look much more attractive than others

phil


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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by redsquirrel » Sun Mar 10, 2013 8:43 am

just to clarlfy,i didnt mean princeps were v shaped. the manipur was though but looked like part of a princeps leaf if you know what i mean icon_thumright
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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by GoggleboxUK » Sun Mar 10, 2013 3:06 pm

pipster 12 wrote:Is there any way to upload photos on here dave? of the princeps hybride?

kind regards
phil
Here's a guide and discussion offering alternative methods:

http://www.hardytropicals.co.uk/forum/v ... +the+forum

;)
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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by Nigel » Thu Apr 04, 2013 8:53 pm

Manipur is hardy enough for the UK, terribly slow though and awful to grow when small.
The princeps hybrid I have invested heavily in. Its an awesome plant. Maybe the most awesome.
It is like a princeps in many ways, grows fast, is easy, and the ones I have in Brazil are looking amazing.

As to confusing latisectus with manipur , not going to happen. Latisectus has coffee bean seed, manipur a reniform seed , as far apart as possible so nobody could possibly make that mistake.
The only confusion can be in that rarepalmseeds sell manipur as oreophilus which in my opinion is ridiculous.
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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by Andy Martin » Fri Apr 05, 2013 12:05 am

I have had a Manipur out in a pot for two years now. Nigel is correct... its quite slow to grow. But it hasn't suffered any frost damage. The leaf damage on it was from a smoking paraffin heater. My other Manipur is still in the Greenhouse and is just developing a trunk
Outside Manipur
IMG_0602.JPG
Trunking Manipur
IMG_0555.JPG
Princeps hybrid
IMG_0554.JPG
They are all going out this year as they do not grow in pots.


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Simba
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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by Simba » Fri Apr 05, 2013 12:20 am

I didn't realise that Manipur was so distinctively different.....
Hmm, I want one now, would make an ideal replacement for Trithrinax Acanthacoma.... icon_thumright


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Re: trachycarpus manipur

Post by JBALLY » Fri Apr 05, 2013 3:08 am

I believe Kev Spence's manipur came through -12c in "that winter" planted out and it is not in a favourable spot either as in winter it receives hardly any sun if it receives any at all is in shade a lot of the time if my memory serves me correctly. Mine larger one (6 inch trunk) is still in a pot and gets put in unheated greenhouse over winter but I will not hesitate in planting it out when my back garden has been re designed and ready for it. It is a beautiful looking palm in my opinion.


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