Trachycarpus latisectus?

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Troppoz
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Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by Troppoz » Wed Jan 28, 2009 10:58 pm

Does anyone know much about this palm? Someone in Melbourne has offered to trade some seed of this for some of my palm seeds.

Is this something that should cope witht he tropics? Pretty much all I know about Trachycarpus is that they are very cold hardy but does that apply to this species as well or is it more of a warm climate palm :?:

Any info would be appreciated!

Sean
Sean


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bodster
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Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by bodster » Wed Jan 28, 2009 11:06 pm

Its from darjeeling Sean. Its supposed to be too tender for here so worth a go where you are. sites I've seen have said its OK in the tropics


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Troppoz
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Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by Troppoz » Wed Jan 28, 2009 11:17 pm

Thanks Martin thats all the encouragement I need!

Dare I say it but since I have joined this forum I am starting to relent about palms in my garden... :!:

Im looking forward to a nice Trachycarpus after seeing all of yours.
Sean


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bodster
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Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by bodster » Wed Jan 28, 2009 11:22 pm

latisectus is a very nice one. I think it has the largest leaves. One I'm trying at the moment is this one:

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/68675/


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SteveP
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Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by SteveP » Wed Jan 28, 2009 11:54 pm

Sean, a number of guys on here are growing this. Mine has been grown on from a seedling and is just about ready for planting out. It took about -6C(ish) over our new year cold spell and only suffered minor leaf damage, so has a reasonable degree of hardiness - although it did have an overhead evergreen canopy. I will be planting it out this spring and will provide updates on progress. I recall about a year ago that there was a fabulous specimen on the cover of Chamaerops, the EPS magazine. Maybe one of the EPS guys can enlighten us further because when grown well they are fabulous.

Steve

PS I will post a pic of the damage to mine when I get chance.


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trachy1973
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Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by trachy1973 » Thu Jan 29, 2009 1:46 am

Hi Sean, I have a seedling of one that is growing quite quickly on my windowsill. They are hardy down to -7 but unlike most of the Trachycarpus family do also grow ok in the hotter more humid and tropical regions so they should be ok for you in Northern Australia. icon_thumleft

Another interesting feature on this palm is that it's trunk is bare without the fibrous covering to the trunk characteristic of most Trachycarpus.

It might be a bit marginal in the UK but I have heard of specimens growing down south that seem to be doing ok.

It think I will give it a go here and plant her up in a couple of years.

Cheers

Keith
Attachments
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Trachycarpus Latisectus


col

Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by col » Thu Jan 29, 2009 7:23 am

Troppoz wrote:Thanks Martin thats all the encouragement I need!

Dare I say it but since I have joined this forum I am starting to relent about palms in my garden... :!:

Im looking forward to a nice Trachycarpus after seeing all of yours.
:lol: Sean - I had to laugh at the irony of you over there in the tropics taking encouragement on palm tree growing from a bunch of Brits! :lol:


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Troppoz
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Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by Troppoz » Thu Jan 29, 2009 8:11 am

:lol:

Next Ill be asking for advice on getting the best suntan and how to cook a BBQ!!!

Thanks people for the information - Ill let you know how it performs...
Sean


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bodster
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Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by bodster » Thu Jan 29, 2009 8:40 am

talking of unusual trachycarpus. Is anyone else growing trachycarpus princeps (the blue one not the green nova)?


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GARYnNAT
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Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by GARYnNAT » Thu Jan 29, 2009 9:43 am

bodster wrote:talking of unusual trachycarpus. Is anyone else growing trachycarpus princeps (the blue one not the green nova)?
I have a small one Martin that I got from Dave Ison a few years ago, its still small and not that fast, typical Trachycarpus :D , hopefully as it gets bigger it will start to motor :D

Gary
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My green thumb came only as a result of the mistakes I made while learning to see things from the plant's point of view


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bodster
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Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by bodster » Thu Jan 29, 2009 9:47 am

I got one from Nigel last year thats showing nice colouring. I should have bought a couple!


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trachy1973
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Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by trachy1973 » Thu Jan 29, 2009 10:41 am

I have a seedling or Princeps Bodster, a bit smaller than the picture of my Latisectus. I think they are hardier than Latisectus.

The only Trachycarpus I do not have are Nanus and Oreophilius. I have two seedlings of Manipur (Naga Hills). Like Latisectus they have the smooth trunk and hardiness is as Fortunei.

My Martianus (Nepal) seedling is same size as my Latisectus with similar hardiness.

I also have a Trachycarpus Mount Victoria bought from http://www.mypalmshop.com/EN/
Not seen any pictures of this so do not know what it looks like when mature or indeed how hardy it is.

Germinisectus is also as hardy as Fortunei with thick waxy leaves.

The only problem I have is where to plant them all when they are big enough! icon_scratch

Keith


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Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by Robin Cassell » Thu Jan 29, 2009 11:32 am

Hi Sean
I think Latisectus would take off great where you are..from what Ive read it likes summer humidity and can take cold at high elevations..so I think if you had one it would be in permanent growing mode! icon_sunny :mrgreen: first pic 3 years old seedlings 2nd pic 10 year old and unlikely to survive in my garden..I think my 2 seedlings will suffer same fate if I plant out..If I could get one into youre garden id let you have one.
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Nathan
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Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by Nathan » Thu Jan 29, 2009 12:46 pm

Here's my Trachycarpus latisectus, they are much more elegant looking than fortunei with "thinner" leaves more like a Livistona...
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02012009572latisectus.jpg
Malta - USDA Zone 11a


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stephenprudence
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Re: Trachycarpus latisectus?

Post by stephenprudence » Thu Jan 29, 2009 12:52 pm

damn riiiight I get it now... one of my Trachycarpus 'fortuneis' was actually a latisectus! I thought it looked a little different, the frond segments didn't part like the fortunei..

!!
Heswall, Wirral, UK
USDA equivalent average temperature zone: 9a/RHS zone 3
AHS Heat Zone: 1
Last 5 winter minimums:
2007: -0.1C, 2008: -4.2C, 2009: -5.7C, 2010: -10.5 (record), 2011: -4.9C, 2012: -5.3, 2013: -4.5C (so far)


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