U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

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GoggleboxUK
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U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by GoggleboxUK » Thu Jul 25, 2013 10:56 am

Once upon a time there were 3 little bears. Now there's thousands of them.


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Dim
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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by Dim » Thu Jul 25, 2013 2:24 pm

Create Problem .... offer solution:

welcome to robobee:

http://io9.com/swarms-of-robotic-bees-c ... -453423657

Image

not sure that these robotic bees will be very effective though
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We live off The Energy IN the food we eat!!!"
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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by Alexander » Sun Jul 28, 2013 3:48 am

I guess its not only bees wich suffer from this. The sharp decline of the number of butterflies could also has to do with it! And the dissapairrance of wildflowermeadows could also be a reason bees get into difficulty. If they have only 1 foodsource that could not be that good.
Well the whole way intensive of farming is bassically lethal to most wildlive! Here in The Netherlands you will find more wildlive in urabanised areas then in the countryside.

Alexander


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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by Rabbie » Mon Jul 29, 2013 4:29 pm

Farm land is nothing more than green industrial estates. Sooner people understand that the better, nothing natural about it.


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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by Dave Brown » Mon Jul 29, 2013 5:29 pm

I haven't seen a Honey Bee in 2 years now. Yet we are only 400m from the nearest Oil Seed Rape fields. Used to see literally hundreds of Small Tortoiseshell Butterflies, haven't seen ANY of those for maybe 15 years.
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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by Alexander » Tue Jul 30, 2013 3:27 am

Rabbie wrote:Farm land is nothing more than green industrial estates. Sooner people understand that the better, nothing natural about it.
We get plenty of that here! I guess 25 percent of the countrysite here in The Netherlands is now green corn. They use that for feeding pigs. And then those famous Dutch tulips thanks to all the chemicl spreaying.

Alexander


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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by Alexander » Tue Jul 30, 2013 4:10 am

Dave Brown wrote:I haven't seen a Honey Bee in 2 years now. Yet we are only 400m from the nearest Oil Seed Rape fields. Used to see literally hundreds of Small Tortoiseshell Butterflies, haven't seen ANY of those for maybe 15 years.
Dave,

Is it that bad overthere? I see less bees then in the past but still see them here. I have lots of Origanum vulgare flowering here, they love that plant. And the small totoiseshell butterfly I see now every day here. A couple of weeks ago I had 10 on my allotment garden. I have lots of Knautia arvensis growing there, its almost a weed. But a very good butterflyplant. And Scabiosa columbaria Well I have exotic plants but also a lot of native stuff. And I try to attract butterflies and other insects as well. Also lots of bumblebees. The Stachys betonicifolia is full of them at the moment.

Alexander


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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by Dave Brown » Tue Jul 30, 2013 7:48 am

Alexander wrote: Dave,

Is it that bad overthere?
Alexander
Unfortunately yes.
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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by Kristen » Tue Jul 30, 2013 10:57 am

Been on my New Years Resolution list to keep bees for several years now. I've had to put it down as a Fail each year :( I just don't have the time.

I think what I need to do is find a local bee keeper and buy the hives etc. for them to then look after for me, if they would be willing. I'd love to do a bit to help.

Could you keep Bees Dave - others too maybe?
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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by Dave Brown » Tue Jul 30, 2013 1:25 pm

Kristen wrote:Been on my New Years Resolution list to keep bees for several years now. I've had to put it down as a Fail each year :( I just don't have the time.

I think what I need to do is find a local bee keeper and buy the hives etc. for them to then look after for me, if they would be willing. I'd love to do a bit to help.

Could you keep Bees Dave - others too maybe?
We have lots of Bumble and Humble Bees Kristen. I think the population has increased as the Honey Bee declined. Sedum plants were smothered in flowers and Bumble Bees until last week. :wink:
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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by allangreenbean » Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:33 pm

There are certain plants I grow specifically because it provides a good chemical free food source for bees.

Rosemary, Honeysuckle, Hollyhocks (yeah, you heard me right), lavender, sprouting broccoli and a few others

They are also all evergreen varieties too :D


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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by Alexander » Wed Jul 31, 2013 5:33 am

Well it seems the honeybee, Apis mellifera was originally not native to the British Isles. It seems to origenate is eastern Tropical Africa!
There where and still are many wild sollitary bee species.
The Romans seem to have introduced honeybees. And before the Europeans went to the New World there where no Apis in the Americas!

So not everything is lost when they will become rare.

Alexander


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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by Conifers » Wed Jul 31, 2013 8:37 am

Alexander wrote:Well it seems the honeybee, Apis mellifera was originally not native to the British Isles. It seems to origenate is eastern Tropical Africa!
Nope, it is native in Europe too - the European and African populations are different subspecies (actually several subspecies in each continent). Northern Europe's native subspecies (Apis mellifera mellifera) is endemic in NW Europe (not found naturally anywhere else) and is distinct in being much darker than other subspecies.


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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by Alexander » Fri Aug 02, 2013 4:32 am

Conifers wrote:
Alexander wrote:Well it seems the honeybee, Apis mellifera was originally not native to the British Isles. It seems to origenate is eastern Tropical Africa!
Nope, it is native in Europe too - the European and African populations are different subspecies (actually several subspecies in each continent). Northern Europe's native subspecies (Apis mellifera mellifera) is endemic in NW Europe (not found naturally anywhere else) and is distinct in being much darker than other subspecies.
Thanks to correct my error. Good to know we have a wild indigenous honey bee species here.
And now I remember that in Bialowieza people did collect honey from wild bees in de forest.

Alexander


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Re: U.S. Study Reveals Why Bees are Dying Out

Post by Alexander » Fri Aug 02, 2013 4:34 am

Yesterday I saw some honey bees on the Origanum vulgare. I grow the wild species here. Its a kind of weed to be honest.

Alexander


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