hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

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Axel
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hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by Axel » Sun Mar 16, 2014 8:59 pm

Hi all,

I noticed that the UK area's which can grow Phoenix canariensis_CIDP's undamaged such as southern coastal locations and central London all have large red cordyline's as well.

Would you say they are equally hardy or do you know examples of large red cordyline's in area's that cannot support Phoenix canariensis_CIDP's?


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flounder
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Re: hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by flounder » Sun Mar 16, 2014 9:27 pm

Admittedly, I don't get mega low temps here, but cordyline purpurea and red star will re shoot from the ground if top growth done in by the cold whereas phoenix would be brown bread
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stephenprudence
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Re: hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by stephenprudence » Sun Mar 16, 2014 9:55 pm

both have similar leaf hardiness I would say.. perhaps red Cordyline is slightly more tender in leaf?
Heswall, Wirral, UK
USDA equivalent average temperature zone: 9a/RHS zone 3
AHS Heat Zone: 1
Last 5 winter minimums:
2007: -0.1C, 2008: -4.2C, 2009: -5.7C, 2010: -10.5 (record), 2011: -4.9C, 2012: -5.3, 2013: -4.5C (so far)


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DiCasS
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Re: hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by DiCasS » Sun Mar 16, 2014 10:15 pm

Seen a few tall red Cordylines around here in folks' front gardens, but never seen a Phoenix canariensis_CIDP of any size, except the small starter ones from the local sheds which I noticed weren't there the next year. There was a beautiful red one which I used to admire on the way to work, but the 2010 took it out. They dug it up in Spring.

Di
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derrick
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Re: hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by derrick » Sun Mar 16, 2014 10:19 pm

I agree with Flounder Red Cordy don't seem to die .We have lots in Southampton some growing in poor conditions shade pots they keep going .We also have the yellow and green stripe Cordy they seem to be hardy too .But not so many Canary Palms .


Axel
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Re: hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by Axel » Mon Mar 17, 2014 7:51 am

Thanks all,
yes i remember Dave B having a large red cordy (untill 2010 i believe) whereas his garden couldnt support a Phoenix canariensis_CIDP longterm. Could it be that the older red cordy's (planted in the 90's) are purpurea and not red star?
Could that explain some red cordy's surviving in Southampton for example?


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Re: hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by David York » Mon Mar 17, 2014 10:39 am

I've seen several red Cordylines here in the north, and some of them quite old, but I've never seen a canariensis survive more than a winter or two.
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billdango
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Re: hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by billdango » Mon Mar 17, 2014 1:44 pm

I haven,t really noticed any red cordylines in Southampton but the again I haven,t looked for them.

But I have seen a number of tall yellow striped cordylines about that came through the winter of 2010 with hardly any damage.

As for CIDPs there are a few about that are recovering well from that awful winter but some of the largest specimens were dug up to make way for car parking spaces.

The largest Phoenix canariensis_CIDP in the St Denys area of Southampton is still in perfect health and has a hieght of about 14 feet to the top of its leaves.

The even even larger Phoenix canariensis_CIDP just off bevois valley was cut back in 2010 but is now growing a new crown of leaves so should look fantastic if we get a decent summer.

Iff I see any cordyline [red star] I will let the forum know.

billdango :D


Axel
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Re: hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by Axel » Mon Mar 17, 2014 2:00 pm

Hi Bill, do you mean Torbay dazzlers when you say yellow striped cordy's. I always understood they were more tender than red star.


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billdango
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Re: hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by billdango » Mon Mar 17, 2014 2:17 pm

Axel wrote:Hi Bill, do you mean Torbay dazzlers when you say yellow striped cordy's. I always understood they were more tender than red star.
They could be Axel, but I am not sure.

The ones I have seen are about 2 metres tall and are in perfect condition.

I remember seeing them planted a few years ago and have come through every winter since with no protection.

You can see one of them on google earth and it can be found in [Bullar road,bitterne park,Southampton.

Its at the top end near the traffic lights in a small front garden so see if you can identify it.

It was going to be included in my posts last year called [100 exotics in Southampton parks and gardens] but the house owner refused me permission to take a picture for these forums.

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Last edited by billdango on Wed Mar 19, 2014 1:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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cheshirepalms
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Re: hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by cheshirepalms » Mon Mar 17, 2014 10:06 pm

I would say they are very close in deed when it comes to hardiness. Red cordylines are much cheaper and readily available than CIDPs and also grow much quicker, which might explain why they are more common, particularly further north.


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Nathan
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Re: hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by Nathan » Tue Mar 18, 2014 11:11 am

I would say the red Cordyline's are hardier...

Where my Mum lives (around 8 miles inland of Portsmouth) Phoenix canariensis were killed during winter 2010, but all the red Cordyline's that I know of (including some in my Mum's garden) survived.
Malta - USDA Zone 11a


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stephenprudence
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Re: hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by stephenprudence » Tue Mar 18, 2014 3:52 pm

Most members on here must have a milder climate than mine, as 2010 killed red Cordylines back to the ground here. I would go as far to say they are not hardy here (local to me), simply because they cannot grow long term to mature stage. In fact no Cordyline is hardy in my garden thanks to 2010. (Obviously such a winter will happen again in my lifetime)..

By that token Phoenix canariensis_CIDP is also not hardy here (in my locality), but I knew that already.

It is very close I think, Cordyline are perhaps more tolerant of moist + cold, than CIDPs, when young, which may also be a factor.
Heswall, Wirral, UK
USDA equivalent average temperature zone: 9a/RHS zone 3
AHS Heat Zone: 1
Last 5 winter minimums:
2007: -0.1C, 2008: -4.2C, 2009: -5.7C, 2010: -10.5 (record), 2011: -4.9C, 2012: -5.3, 2013: -4.5C (so far)


Clive60
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Re: hardiness red cordyline vs. Phoenix canariensis_CIDP

Post by Clive60 » Tue Mar 18, 2014 8:25 pm

There are a lot of 8ft+ red Cordys around here but not many good CIDPs. As for Torbay Dazzlers, there are lots of them too, many again 8ft+ but I have never seen one flower or branched!


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