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Warm watering .......

Posted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 11:11 pm
by samtobuk
Have seen plenty of references to using heated water for palms and other exotics. What are the benefits (theoretical or proven!) of using warm over cold?

And more to the point, is there a simple way of getting a decent volume of warm water (or do you just attach your hose to a hot/mixer tap?)? Perhaps this is just special treatment for the best and biggest tropicals, and a watering can and kettle/cold tap is the way to go?

Would be interested to hear experiences of the benefits, as sounds like quite an effort so would like to hear some evidence before working out how I could do it!

Thanks in advance! icon_DJ

Re: Warm watering .......

Posted: Tue Apr 01, 2014 12:23 am
by Kristen
Dave has described it in some threads, a quick search turned up these two:

http://www.hardytropicals.co.uk/forum/v ... f=1&t=7751

http://www.hardytropicals.co.uk/forum/v ... 18#p180218

Re: Warm watering .......

Posted: Tue Apr 01, 2014 6:15 am
by Yorkshire Kris
Greville has an excellent thread or two on the subject as well.

Re: Warm watering .......

Posted: Tue Apr 01, 2014 3:06 pm
by multim
I water from a can which at ambient temperature. Less of a shock to plants than a soaking from a hose.

Re: Warm watering .......

Posted: Tue Apr 01, 2014 8:15 pm
by kata
Watering can with tepid to room temp water,

Mind you, for the plants indoors a small palm included I leave those till it rains then they go out.

:mrgreen:

Re: Warm watering .......

Posted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 6:59 am
by ConcreteJungle
Nice topic - has opened my eyes - might give this a try to my new additions this spring to see if it helps to get notably established quicker

Re: Warm watering .......

Posted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 9:50 am
by Daniel
samtobuk wrote:
And more to the point, is there a simple way of getting a decent volume of warm water icon_DJ
Get your plumber to connect up an outside hot water tap next to your outside cold water tap, mine is out the back of my kitchen so it was easy to take a pipe from the water that feeds the sink. It is best to have the hot and cold feeds as separate taps so that you can control the temperature of the water going through to your hosepipe. I have a very short piece of hosepipe from each tap and then join them with a 'y' connector to my main hosepipe and then have a fair amount of control over the temperature. For example, I use hot water on my Sabals, warm water on most other things and cool water on Trachys etc.

Re: Warm watering .......

Posted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 10:27 am
by otorongo
The water in my cans warms up to around 45C at this time of year on sunny days, and I use that directly on the plants (in the evenings of course). I orient the cans to SW on the days I'm out, and when I'm in I re-orient them several times during the day to be slightly ahead of the sun (to last me longer), so I get even higher temps. I also tilt them back slightly to accommodate for the increasing angle of the sun.

In a month it will be more like 60C, which may be too hot. You probably want to dilute that with cooler water.

Re: Warm watering .......

Posted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 11:17 am
by Nathan
An easier (& cheaper) alternative is to fill a kiddies paddling pool up in a sunny spot & then by the evening time the water will be reasonably warm, easy enough to dunk your watering can in to water stuff too...

Re: Warm watering .......

Posted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 8:15 pm
by jungle jas
I always use the water from the bath, recycled so no extra cost. There is also a water diverter available if you can get to your bath waste pipe. icon_thumright

Re: Warm watering .......

Posted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 8:59 pm
by derrick
I have a baby bath in my monitor lizard cage and the waters heated ,The water has to be changed as the lizard dumps init .So i throw that on the garden .

Re: Warm watering .......

Posted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 10:32 pm
by GREVILLE
Can make a huge difference for some heat loving palms i.e. 35c to 40c watering for the likes of Sabal means three leaves per year instead of one or two.

Big leaf plants such as Colocasia and Musa also benefit.