Washingtonia filifera

vivi
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Location: Banbury Oxon

Washingtonia filifera

Post by vivi » Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:21 pm

My 10 year old (deceased) washy was finally dug up and dispatched to the greenbin today.I 'm ashamed to say I killed it by wrapping it up too much :ahhh!: Despite this I really want another,so does anyone know where I can buy a replacement,without costing a fortune?
Thanks

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bodster
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Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by bodster » Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:52 pm

You could always nip up to Akamba in birmingham

themes

Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by themes » Wed Jul 08, 2009 10:33 pm

bodster wrote:You could always nip up to Akamba in birmingham
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Dave Brown
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Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by Dave Brown » Thu Jul 09, 2009 9:29 am

vivi wrote:My 10 year old (deceased) washy was finally dug up and dispatched to the greenbin today.I 'm ashamed to say I killed it by wrapping it up too much :ahhh!: Despite this I really want another,so does anyone know where I can buy a replacement,without costing a fortune?
Thanks
Hi Vivi,

All Washintonia are marginal in the UK, and being in Oxon, your temps may have been too low, as I have heard places saw -12C last winter. On paper W. filifera is more cold tolerant, but W. robusta is more tolerant of damp conditions. Rather than wrapping some people use a rain shelter rather than wrapping, as it stops radiation frost and rain/snow getting into the crown. :wink:
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Dave
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pete G

Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by pete G » Thu Jul 09, 2009 3:40 pm

vivi wrote:My 10 year old (deceased) washy was finally dug up and dispatched to the greenbin today.I 'm ashamed to say I killed it by wrapping it up too much :ahhh!: Despite this I really want another,so does anyone know where I can buy a replacement,without costing a fortune?
Thanks
I bought four for a fiver at B&Q, small, but they grow fast.
Might be ready to plant out next year.

But if your looking for something to plant out now, I guess you will need to part with some cash.

I always look on the bright side, and think, I've got plenty of time and time costs nothing
:lol:

Nick

Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by Nick » Thu Jul 09, 2009 5:18 pm

I to had mine wrapped in fleece all winter, and as we did not get much rain here it went dry and crispy but had mold all over it, so I cut it back and sprayed with a fungicide, it did look like it was trying to grow or do something but that has now gone brown and sadly it looks like the whole plant could now be dieing, a late casualty of the past winter.. :(

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PS mine was a Robustia

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eddie
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Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by eddie » Thu Jul 09, 2009 7:09 pm

This was my first winter with exotics. I've got robustas (or filibustas? don't know) and made a roof over their heads and wrapped them in X-mas lights. Looks nice in the winter garden. They ones in my garden saw -5.8C with no damage, the one in the garden of my girlfriend saw -9 C and has damaged leaves, est. around 50% damaged leaves. It's growing back strong now with 5 new damaged leaves and the one that is now unfolding is the first undamaged green one. Strange thing that there are damaged leaves growing out i think.
Biggest trunk is around 40 cm (1 ft 4 inch ?) high.
Washingtonia Trachycarpus Cordyline? Bamboos Olive tree? Bananas

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eddie
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Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by eddie » Thu Jul 09, 2009 7:10 pm

This was my first winter with exotics. I've got robustas (or filibustas? don't know) and made a roof over their heads and wrapped them in X-mas lights. Looks nice in the winter garden. They ones in my garden saw -5.8C with no damage, the one in the garden of my girlfriend saw -9 C and has damaged leaves, est. around 50% damaged leaves. It's growing back strong now with 5 new damaged leaves and the one that is now unfolding is the first undamaged green one. Strange thing that there are damaged leaves growing out i think.
Biggest trunk is around 40 cm (1 ft 4 inch ?) high.
Washingtonia Trachycarpus Cordyline? Bamboos Olive tree? Bananas

sam140

Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by sam140 » Fri Jul 10, 2009 10:16 pm

What size did it get to vivi.

vivi
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Location: Banbury Oxon

Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by vivi » Sat Jul 11, 2009 12:17 pm

Hi Sam It got to about 7 foot,the trunk was about 2 foot high,with huge leaves,so I',m gutted as I grew it from seed about 15 years ago.
sam140 wrote:What size did it get to vivi.
. :cry:
I have just got a replacement on E bay,170cm for £75,and I will try not to kill it this winter.!!!! :D

vivi
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Location: Banbury Oxon

Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by vivi » Sat Jul 11, 2009 1:16 pm

Hi Bodster
bodster wrote:You could always nip up to Akamba in birmingham
Just looked at Akamba website and it looks amazing!Thanks for the suggestion,will take the kids there in the school holidays.
:D

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bodster
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Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by bodster » Sat Jul 11, 2009 2:02 pm

A trip to akamba is always worth it. Its a great place for plants

sam140

Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by sam140 » Sat Jul 11, 2009 2:05 pm

I think with that size vivi, your better off without protection, no air circulation is a lot more likely to kill it than cold once established. Recovery is quick from cold damage in spring.

This is mine in May, two new fronds after being cold damaged in the winter. It has recieved no protection for last two winters.

Plant faces a south easterly aspect. I would consider this the best siting for a washie f, especially if their is protection from a house from strong westlieries accompanied by heavy rain.
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dyls

Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by dyls » Tue Jul 14, 2009 3:23 pm

I had 9 washies in 2006, and 3 remain. The 6 that died did not die in the winter, but were not "summer hardy" for the soggy 2007 summer. I suspect the 3 that survived are more "robustifera" and the 6 that died were probably more "filibuster". It might not be a bad idea for washies to get a whole heap of cheap small ones and let them take their chances, the survivors after a couple of years being the best prospects for a plant that'll last a while.

sam140

Re: Washingtonia filifera

Post by sam140 » Tue Jul 14, 2009 4:56 pm

That may be the case/best option dyls where you are. But i would say to anyone in the south of britain, don't brother with small plants of filfera, unless you plan to grow on in the consevatory or greenhouse. Get a 4 to 5ft plant and given a good siting prefably facing South east will do well planted in late spring to early summer. Siting is very important to getting a healthy filfera plant going & even more so where you are.

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