Chamaedorea radicalis

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Delboy
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Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Delboy » Wed Dec 28, 2011 3:15 pm

Just wondered how these coped with the past few winters?
My old garden
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Adrian
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Adrian » Wed Dec 28, 2011 7:43 pm

Pretty hardy palms, mine do well with over head cover from larger palms.
I have had mine for quite a long time now.
sorry webshots site no longer available
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targui
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by targui » Wed Dec 28, 2011 8:13 pm

Chamaedorea Radicalis in my experience of growing most Chamaedorea species is
that they are by far the hardiest of the genus. They grow best in shade to semi shade,
will grow in full sun but do not look their best and in fact look rather scruffy in a sunny
garden spot. They appreciate small applications of magnesium from time to time.


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redsquirrel
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by redsquirrel » Wed Dec 28, 2011 8:35 pm

i had a beauty with a foot of trunk from Gary Watton with a debatable sucker,(still believe it grew from the main underground trunky bit) i foolishly left it to its own devices last two winters,came back from being badly damaged then completely rotted out last winter icon_thumbdown
however,Richard Booth gave me a nice one he had grown from seed,its a corker of a young plant and flowered this year,survived -5 to -6 in the un heated conservatory no probs at all
mars ROVER broken down. headgasket faillure


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Delboy
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Delboy » Wed Dec 28, 2011 9:44 pm

So do you reckon planting one in the ground in the midlands is unrealistic?
I guess I could pot plant it, then overwinter in my greenhouse or shed altho both are unheated but at least dry.
My old garden
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New garden......coming soon.


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Yorkshire Kris
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Yorkshire Kris » Wed Dec 28, 2011 9:46 pm

I watered my small potted one this summer too much which rotted most of the roots. It's fine now after repotting.


Rod
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Rod » Wed Dec 28, 2011 11:34 pm

They have proven to be stem hardy to -11.0°c
Latitude; 43°,31'S
Hottest Month; 23.0°c / 12.0°c
Coldest Month; 11.0°c / 2.0°c
Mean Sunshine; 2144 hrs
Mean Rainfall; 618 mm


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stephenprudence
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by stephenprudence » Wed Dec 28, 2011 11:54 pm

-5C absolutely and categorically destroyed mine in 2009 (it was completely see-through) - but then I do have the worst luck with palms :roll:

I've had more luck with Chamaedorea elegans.
Heswall, Wirral, UK
USDA equivalent average temperature zone: 9a/RHS zone 3
AHS Heat Zone: 1
Last 5 winter minimums:
2007: -0.1C, 2008: -4.2C, 2009: -5.7C, 2010: -10.5 (record), 2011: -4.9C, 2012: -5.3, 2013: -4.5C (so far)


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redsquirrel
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by redsquirrel » Thu Dec 29, 2011 7:29 am

in a sheltered spot close to the house would be good,still a risk though but winters like we are having would be no problem for one.Daves got one in the front of his place that was doing well,setting seed aswell i believe
mars ROVER broken down. headgasket faillure


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DaveP
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by DaveP » Sat Dec 31, 2011 10:27 am

I've got both the stemless* and so-called trunking forms and if you set them side by side you would be forgiven for thinking that they were entirely different species. The shorter growing form has quite broad, very leathery leaflets, while the other is altogether more elegant with longer, slender pinnae that are thinner textured and more prone to frost damage. In this country, the stemless form appears to be the most freely available and down here at least, it is bone hardy and almost indestructible. I'm far less confident about the other form and because I only have one young plant that might be difficult to replace, I've yet to risk planting it out.

Despite having lost my more tender Chamaedoreas over the past couple of winters, I'm all set to start again. I just wish that they were freely available at any other than seedling size and although I've tracked down a few recently, I'm still hunting for a decent plant of C. costaricana. To my mind, Chamaedoreas are amongst the most elegant and attractive of all small palms and few can create such a luxuriant, 'jungly' effect. Their relatively small stature means that even sizeable specimens can be easily protected or brought in under cover. Of course I failed to do either and paid the price :roll:

*'Stemless' is a bit misleading, because even this type will eventually develop a short trunk. However, for many years it slowly 'creeps' along the ground, producing a gnarled stocky rhizome at or just below soil level.
Dave in Torquay
When it's cold, it's not so cold :D
When it's hot, it's not so hot :roll:
When it's dry, it's not so dry :|
But when it's wet, it's !!***!! wet icon_aaargh


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Adrian
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Adrian » Sat Dec 31, 2011 8:39 pm

I have never seen the stemless one, I didnt know it existed either.
sorry webshots site no longer available
http://www.palmsociety.org.uk


Rod
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Rod » Sun Jan 01, 2012 11:35 am

DaveP wrote:I've got both the stemless* and so-called trunking forms and if you set them side by side you would be forgiven for thinking that they were entirely different species. The shorter growing form has quite broad, very leathery leaflets, while the other is altogether more elegant with longer, slender pinnae that are thinner textured and more prone to frost damage. In this country, the stemless form appears to be the most freely available and down here at least, it is bone hardy and almost indestructible. I'm far less confident about the other form and because I only have one young plant that might be difficult to replace, I've yet to risk planting it out.

Despite having lost my more tender Chamaedoreas over the past couple of winters, I'm all set to start again. I just wish that they were freely available at any other than seedling size and although I've tracked down a few recently, I'm still hunting for a decent plant of C. costaricana. To my mind, Chamaedoreas are amongst the most elegant and attractive of all small palms and few can create such a luxuriant, 'jungly' effect. Their relatively small stature means that even sizeable specimens can be easily protected or brought in under cover. Of course I failed to do either and paid the price :roll:

*'Stemless' is a bit misleading, because even this type will eventually develop a short trunk. However, for many years it slowly 'creeps' along the ground, producing a gnarled stocky rhizome at or just below soil level.
You can easily plant out your C. radicalis in Torquay.
I know someone in Loughborough in the mid-lands with a few C. radicalis growing out in the garden and have been for years. His went through -11°c ( defoliated of course ) followed by 2-weeks below 0°c, and are now growing back nicely. ( All survived )
Latitude; 43°,31'S
Hottest Month; 23.0°c / 12.0°c
Coldest Month; 11.0°c / 2.0°c
Mean Sunshine; 2144 hrs
Mean Rainfall; 618 mm


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MonkeyDavid
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by MonkeyDavid » Sun Jan 01, 2012 4:12 pm

At what temp can you expect damage or defoliation without protection?


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Adrian
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Adrian » Sun Jan 01, 2012 6:14 pm

Should be ok to -4 or -5c if with good overhead cover, no idea if out in the open.
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DaveP
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by DaveP » Mon Jan 02, 2012 12:20 am

Rod wrote: You can easily plant out your C. radicalis in Torquay.
Yes I know, I've had several growing here for 12 -13 years. They are bone hardy here and set fruit almost every autumn. The so-called 'trunking form' however, is not quite so hardy and since I've only got 1 of these, I'm letting it get to a reasonable size before I plant it out.
Dave in Torquay
When it's cold, it's not so cold :D
When it's hot, it's not so hot :roll:
When it's dry, it's not so dry :|
But when it's wet, it's !!***!! wet icon_aaargh


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