Chamaedorea radicalis

GREVILLE
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by GREVILLE » Mon Oct 15, 2012 9:14 pm

Perhaps I should take the direction of this thread to a "What do you think?" survey. icon_scratch

The original palm was twice the size of my current one when planted. A check on my older post under 'Soil Warming' logged the appearance of the new plant right next to the base of the old as 1998, two years after planting. The original palm grown from seed must have been four or five years old when planted out which implies the second seed in the pot must have taken seven years to germinate after the first. :shock:

On the other hand, could this original Chamaedorea have been a hybrid - crossed with a suckering variety? As C. radicalis is not known to sucker, could this explain the new plant? If so, will the current plant eventually throw out another sucker? :shock: :shock:

The plot thickens: When the whole palm disappeared from view being strangled by Sasa palmata runners, I got to the point where I was watering a palm "that was in there somewhere". Could the plant have been 'choked back' to the growing point unseen by my human eye and started again? :shock: :shock: :shock:

What do you think, forum readers? Did this palm come from seed, sucker or resurrection (phoenix from the ashes :ahhh!: )?

Answers not on a postcard, please :lol:


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redsquirrel
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by redsquirrel » Mon Oct 15, 2012 9:31 pm

thats just it Grev,surely a seed would have rotted in that time.
i have to admit im a non conformist on the radicalis dont sucker.when my trunking form died,a second plant emerged from or extremely close to the underground trunky bit which almost resembled a short fat tetrapanax runner.the texture of the dead trunk was something new to me too.
im only a minnow in the palm world and am probably imagining things but to my mind,i think mine suckered.
mars ROVER broken down. headgasket faillure


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Mr List
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Mr List » Sun Jan 06, 2013 1:32 am

just looking for a bit of cultivation advice on these for next year.

there are two possible spots for me to plant them.

no.1
on the right side of my garden which is near to a north facing fence under an aralia elata ,
this would be my first choice by design.full shade.

no.2
near to a (but not under the cover of) fatsia by a south facing fence. part/full sun.


also how do they like the soil?


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Yorkshire Kris
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Yorkshire Kris » Sun Jan 06, 2013 10:09 am

Mr List wrote:just looking for a bit of cultivation advice on these for next year.

there are two possible spots for me to plant them.

no.1
on the right side of my garden which is near to a north facing fence under an aralia elata ,
this would be my first choice by design.full shade.

no.2
near to a (but not under the cover of) fatsia by a south facing fence. part/full sun.


also how do they like the soil?

The roots rot in wet soil, even in summer.


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Mr List
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Mr List » Sun Jan 06, 2013 5:04 pm

what do you mean by wet?


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Dave Brown
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Dave Brown » Sun Jan 06, 2013 6:23 pm

Paul Spraklin, came across these in habitat in Northern Mexico, and said they were growing in leaf litter in cracks in rock. It was essentially dry, well drained shade, but these can take more sun than other species of Chamaedorea. The way he described the soil was more like an epiphyte/orchid mix.

My planted ones only get watered in hot, dry conditions.
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Yorkshire Kris
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Yorkshire Kris » Sun Jan 06, 2013 7:19 pm

Mr List wrote:what do you mean by wet?

i.e. water it more like an Agave rather than a Phoenix palm.


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Mr List
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Mr List » Sun Jan 06, 2013 9:58 pm

this could be problamatic.
i don't have any dry areas of garden.


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cordyman
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by cordyman » Tue Apr 30, 2013 8:35 pm

bump

fancy one of these,

any advice on where to buy, so far i've found

http://www.palms-exotics.co.uk/chamaedo ... p-372.html


also has anyone got up to date pics of how theirs is doing? icon_salut


JBALLY
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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by JBALLY » Wed May 01, 2013 12:18 am

These look to be quite a good size for the price, will be hard to get better value http://www.hardy-palms.co.uk/product.as ... roduct=100 icon_thumleft


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Re: Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by otorongo » Wed May 23, 2018 9:16 pm

Do we now have more data on the hardiness of the trunking form? I have one trunkless one and am considering getting a trunking one.

Also this is listed on ebay as the trunking form, but the broad leaves would suggest it's the trunkless form... but then again it may be because it's so small. Any thoughts on this?


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Dave Brown
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Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by Dave Brown » Tue Jun 19, 2018 11:08 am

Trunkless are planted out and survived -9.9C protected by a fleece bag, but the trunking one is still in a pot. As I only have the one, not about to experiment too much.
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GREVILLE
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Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by GREVILLE » Tue Jun 19, 2018 5:06 pm

I do have two of these so one is in the ground, this winter being it's first. Glad to say it survived the beast from the east with only small potted hardy plants standing on the soil around it. My potted one stayed in an unheated shed with an overhead skylight. Cold enough to kill a couple of large aloes but not this little tyke.

My trunk less one is also potted and this is bigger and this survived the freezing shed, too.


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Chamaedorea radicalis

Post by chainsaw kid » Thu Jun 21, 2018 5:42 pm

My Radicalis got fried this year or I suppose I should say desiccated, not a square mm of green on it at all I feared the worst, however after the warm weather we have had I know have one new green leaf and another on the way! so I suppose all is well, my advice, don't plant in a windy spot. :roll:
Don't Just sit there, plant something!

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