UK Chamaedorea radicalis forest

lucienc
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Post by lucienc » Fri Nov 09, 2007 8:13 pm

Dave Brown wrote:
lucienc wrote:My little pot of them are doing well Dave... currently having a luxury life in the conservatory, they have no idea whats instore for them next spring.
:shock: They can't be any bigger than 6" will you just lose them under any small weed :lol:
Well they better get themselves growing then :)


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Adrian
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Post by Adrian » Fri Nov 09, 2007 8:39 pm

Sorry about living in Southampton Palmer :lol:
What I can tell you is that we get lows to minus 8.
In 2005/06 winter we had a couple of -8s, 70 sub zero nights and 28 sub -3, daytime temps do rise above zero though and (apparently) the light level is very good.
It aint no Cornwall here for sure.
Theres a city not 12 miles from here and they rarely get frosts but given the choice of living there or giving up exotics then Id be looking at rose catalogues now :lol:
sorry webshots site no longer available
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bodster
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Post by bodster » Fri Nov 09, 2007 8:54 pm

are you refering to bournemouth Ade? :)


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Dave Brown
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Post by Dave Brown » Fri Nov 09, 2007 9:25 pm

Adrian wrote: Theres a city not 12 miles from here and they rarely get frosts but given the choice of living there or giving up exotics then Id be looking at rose catalogues now :lol:
Ade, that wouldn't happen to be the home of Lord Nelson's flag ship. the Victory, would it. :shock: Bloody good job Aido lives in Southsea then, or he'd be blocking your IP address :lol: :lol:

Tony, the Southampton area seems to be a sandy soil area that is prone to cold nights. Colder than I get in the Thames estuary with heavy clay. Coldest night here in 2005/6 winter was -5.1C, and Ade's pics showed quite a lot more damage than I had. Lower lattitude is not a guarentee of mildness. :roll:
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Alexander
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Post by Alexander » Sat Nov 10, 2007 3:38 am

I have seen Chamaedora microspadix growing wild in a mixed forest in the Sierra Gorda in Mexico. They where growing in a forest of Tilia mexicana, Carpinus, Liqiudamber, Hickorrya, Cercis canadensis, 2 species of Magnolia among M. dealbata, Ceratozamia mexicana, Choisya ternata, Pinguicula moranensis, Cupressus lusitanica, Pinus sp.,Aporocactus flagelliformis, Quercus,Dahlias,Bromelias, Begonias, a Brahea? And a lot more stuff. It was springtime there and a very enshanting place! Especially the mixture of familiar trees like hornbeam and linden with tropical stuf growing underneeth it and on it.
It was a forest on limestone. Vey strange to see Magnolias on limestone!

Mexico is raly a paradise for planthunters!!!!!!!

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Alexander


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Re: UK Chamaedorea radicalis forest

Post by Alexander » Sat Nov 10, 2007 3:45 am

Well maybe is Chamaedora radicalis a good candidate to introduce in forest in the south of the country. Just to see what it will do.

In Ticino in Switzerland Trachycarpus fortunei is naturalising due to the blackbirds wich feed on the fruit and disperssed them into the nearby forests.

Regards,

Alexander
Dave Brown wrote:I bought a small clump of Chamaedorea radicalis mail order from the Palm Centre back in around 2000. I grew it on and planted out in 2004.

Image

Since that time it has grown slowly but has flowered and set seed twice. The first lot were mostly knocked off by strong winter gales, and so I only had a handful of ripe seed. I sowed these and all but one rotted, but I think I had them too wet. The one that grew was quite a robust grower. In 2006 the clump had 2 complete flower spikes which made it through the winter of 2006/7 without any fruit dropping.

one of the two branches of ripening fruit in March 2007
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The fruit was harvested in early June and sown using the baggy method, but with a more open mix. They were just placed in an unheated prop, which fluctuated between 20 and 27C. To date I have had 76 of these germinate and have potted them on in small clumps of 5 or 6 per pot. This increases the chances of having both sexes in the pot, so they should be breeding clumps.

This pic is in mid August 2007 with the 2006 seedling palm (large one) together with the first of the 2007 seedlings.
Image

During the late summer and early autumn many more seedlings have emerged. Pic below was tsken 4th November. The large seedling (top right) in the 2006 seedling. The (top left) next to it is the Trunked radicalis given by GARYnNAT, but from Peter Richardson seed. This is clearly a more delicate slower growing form, as the two are roughly the same age within a month or so. To the front are the pots of 2007 seedlings.
Image

This palm would seem to be a good candidate for naturalising in the wetter parts of the UK.


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GARYnNAT
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Post by GARYnNAT » Sat Nov 10, 2007 10:34 am

While we are on the subject of Chamaedora's dont suppose anyone knows where I might obtain a Chamaedora microspadix, can't recall seeing any available on my travels :D

Gary


DavidF
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Post by DavidF » Sat Nov 10, 2007 1:19 pm

Hi Mark, Nigel @ Hardy Palms has some seedlings on offer on his website....

:D


Alexander
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Post by Alexander » Sun Nov 11, 2007 3:59 am

I got it from 'degroeneprins' a nursery here in The Netherlands.

Regards,

Alexander
GARYnNAT wrote:While we are on the subject of Chamaedora's dont suppose anyone knows where I might obtain a Chamaedora microspadix, can't recall seeing any available on my travels :D

Gary


ColinB
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Post by ColinB » Sun Nov 11, 2007 9:40 pm

I have had 3 Ch. radicalis in the ground for 3 years now and they get no protection at all. They are sheltered only by taller plants. They have taken -8c with no problems.


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Dave Brown
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Re: UK Chamaedorea radicalis forest

Post by Dave Brown » Mon Oct 20, 2008 11:43 pm

Time to bump up this topic. Who still has the baby radicalis then? and how are they doing?
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AndyC
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Re: UK Chamaedorea radicalis forest

Post by AndyC » Tue Oct 21, 2008 6:48 am

The seedlings you gave me Dave have remained healthy and grown on a bit. In a couple of years time I'd like to plant them around the one I have in the garden to create a thicket. I think it will look better than one on its own, it tends to get a bit lost when the neighbouring plants get going in the summer.
Andy


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bodster
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Re: UK Chamaedorea radicalis forest

Post by bodster » Tue Oct 21, 2008 6:51 am

mine are still alive and well :)


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GARYnNAT
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Re: UK Chamaedorea radicalis forest

Post by GARYnNAT » Tue Oct 21, 2008 10:42 am

A pic of ours :D The large one at the back I grew from seed collected at Cambridge Botanical Gardens a few years ago, it has been planted out for 2 years with no problems, now potted up for the move.
The small ones at the front are from seed from Peter Richardson and are a trunked form from NZ
garden sept 08 047.jpg
Gary
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Re: UK Chamaedorea radicalis forest

Post by MarkD » Tue Oct 21, 2008 10:47 am

Which is more common, the trunked or shorter/untrunked one?


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