Do Roebellinis need much winter light

dino
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Re: Do Roebellinis need much winter light

Post by dino » Sat Dec 11, 2010 8:37 pm

They've got to be in some kind of microclimate.


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sanatic1234
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Re: Do Roebellinis need much winter light

Post by sanatic1234 » Sat Dec 11, 2010 9:32 pm

I have a seed grown one from this year doesn't get watered loads but is growing lovely and is in full sun in my window, how long do these take to form a trunk?
Best regards Aaron :)

Summer 2013 was a good one :-).

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cai williams
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Re: Do Roebellinis need much winter light

Post by cai williams » Sat Dec 25, 2010 8:39 pm

i would give them a lot of light; mine is in the conservatory and doing well, and if it starts to play up from the cold, put it in the conservatory or any other high celinged room (should you have one) You could just leave it in there, as their max. height is only 2.5m


countrylover
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Re: Do Roebellinis need much winter light

Post by countrylover » Fri Dec 31, 2010 12:36 pm

A little update.
Both robelenis are dead after few nights with -12C.
Still looking for a huge Pseudopanax crassifolius...


Nigel Fear
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Re: Do Roebellinis need much winter light

Post by Nigel Fear » Fri Dec 31, 2010 1:06 pm

countrylover wrote:A little update.
Both robelenis are dead after few nights with -12C.
I guess they were dead before Marcin, but just didn't realise it at the time.
:lol:
I'd be interested to hear what minimums they could withstand under cover though, without frost on the leaves.


countrylover
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Re: Do Roebellinis need much winter light

Post by countrylover » Fri Dec 31, 2010 1:26 pm

Mine have taken -12 under the cover of my lounge :lol:
Seriously I do not fancy putting mine to the risk of frost yet. I may do some research in future since they are pretty cheap here in Germany.
Still looking for a huge Pseudopanax crassifolius...


Nigel Fear
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Re: Do Roebellinis need much winter light

Post by Nigel Fear » Fri Dec 31, 2010 3:17 pm

countrylover wrote:Mine have taken -12 under the cover of my lounge :lol:
:lol: No way! You must get some heating on in your lounge. :lol:


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billdango
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Re: Do Roebellinis need much winter light

Post by billdango » Wed Feb 02, 2011 9:26 pm

i think they do .. i have a three foot one in a pot which stands outside in a protected spot from mid april to october . never under any circumstances let it get to dry at any time or it will just suddenly collapse and die . mine stands in a
small shed next to house with full daylight hours at about +9c most of winter.
so far its 4 years old and doing fine .
regards . billdango.


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fgtbell
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Re: Do Roebellinis need much winter light

Post by fgtbell » Sat Mar 05, 2011 7:43 pm

nicebutdim wrote:.I have trimmed the roots as there is a huge root mass but not much in the way of leaves.I have kept them for 20 years or more but they have never been a great success despite lots of feeding.Does anyone have any ideas on this.
It may sulk now you have trimmed the roots - some palms do.

You say the root mass is huge - that is normal for many palms. Do you think there is any chance it was pot bound before ? If so, then not having enough root space can slow or even stop the growth.

Keeping any plants in pots for such a long time can be difficult. Do you re-pot often ? I kept a variegated ficus in a pot for many years - and found that most composts would compress (collapse) within a couple of years, and then the plant would benefit from a re-pot.
Francis Bell
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Climate: cool temperate, zone 8b


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