Bamboo.

User avatar
karl66
Posts: 2645
Joined: Mon Jul 11, 2011 6:39 pm
Location: halesowen. west midlands

Bamboo.

Post by karl66 » Mon Sep 26, 2011 8:39 pm

If things go to plan, i've got big ideas for mixing black bamboo with another type to create some screening. I have no experience with any type, any was wondering if you can keep lopping off the top without causing the bamboo any damage?. karl.P.S, not till next sping.

Mr List

Re: Bamboo.

Post by Mr List » Mon Sep 26, 2011 8:55 pm

it would make sense to choose a selection of bamboos that grow roughly the max size of the hedge you want in the first place.

i believe the advantage of using bamboo for hedging is that once you cut the top the culms don't get any taller.

i should imagine the amount in percent of height you plan to permenently remove annually would determin if it is harmful to the bamboo or not.

at a guess more than a third of the height would worry me.

User avatar
simon
Posts: 2418
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2007 6:02 pm
Location: Slough, Berkshire

Re: Bamboo.

Post by simon » Tue Sep 27, 2011 11:03 am

Cutting the tops off won't cause any direct harm but removing any foliage will reduce its vigour to a slight degree as you are removing some potential to photosynthesise. This would be no worse than some of us who remove lower branches to expose the culms.

As Mr. List said, be careful to check the ultimate height of your selected bamboo against your height requirement because cutting off too much will look daft. For example, it may look OK at first to reduce a new plant with 7ft culms down to 6ft because you will just be cutting through the fine top growth, but as it becomes established it will produce larger culms and if you end up reducing 20ft culms down to 6ft it will just look wrong.

User avatar
karl66
Posts: 2645
Joined: Mon Jul 11, 2011 6:39 pm
Location: halesowen. west midlands

Re: Bamboo.

Post by karl66 » Tue Oct 04, 2011 6:55 pm

Thinking now of getting some bamboo early in a 50% sale. I want a few varieties that are non invasive, grow very thick bamboo canes & are nice & colourful. Also smallish leaves. Any reccomendations. karl.

cordyman

Re: Bamboo.

Post by cordyman » Tue Oct 04, 2011 7:30 pm

Check out Mulu's Fargesia section - all clumping so none invasive

http://www.mulu.co.uk/plant_list.php?id=8


The black nigra gets very big and i'm not sure how good it would look lopped down - also invasive

Image


I have jiuzhaigou for small leaves but small leaves probably = smaller culms

http://www.mulu.co.uk/plant_info.php?id=1011


My favourite which I have a screen of is the Robusta Campbell with its gorgeous checkered effect - its absolutely romped away in 5 months but none invasive :)

http://www.mulu.co.uk/plant_info.php?id=326


Scabrida is another favoutite Fergasia clumper again, with a lot of red colouration

http://www.mulu.co.uk/plant_info.php?id=619

User avatar
karl66
Posts: 2645
Joined: Mon Jul 11, 2011 6:39 pm
Location: halesowen. west midlands

Re: Bamboo.

Post by karl66 » Tue Oct 04, 2011 8:39 pm

cordyman wrote:Check out Mulu's Fargesia section - all clumping so none invasive

http://www.mulu.co.uk/plant_list.php?id=8


The black nigra gets very big and i'm not sure how good it would look lopped down - also invasive

Image


I have jiuzhaigou for small leaves but small leaves probably = smaller culms

http://www.mulu.co.uk/plant_info.php?id=1011


My favourite which I have a screen of is the Robusta Campbell with its gorgeous checkered effect - its absolutely romped away in 5 months but none invasive :)

http://www.mulu.co.uk/plant_info.php?id=326


Scabrida is another favoutite Fergasia clumper again, with a lot of red colouration

http://www.mulu.co.uk/plant_info.php?id=619
Many thanks. This bamboo is baffling me :lol: .

Dim

Re: Bamboo.

Post by Dim » Wed Oct 05, 2011 5:18 am

I may be wrong, but always use a suitable root barrier .... even when the bamboo is labeled as clumping/non-invasive, and from what I've gathered, you need to dig a trench at least 4 feet deep for root barrier to be effective

I've never planted bamboo (yet) but that's what I've read on a bamboo forum

cordyman

Re: Bamboo.

Post by cordyman » Wed Oct 05, 2011 11:53 am

Fargasia doesn't need barrier. And most grow to a sensible height!

Lazlo Woodbine

Re: Bamboo.

Post by Lazlo Woodbine » Wed Oct 05, 2011 12:33 pm

It really depends how high you want the eventual hedge to be as to the varieties you should select.

Given max heights for bamboos are rarely acheived in the uk.

It really depends how much work/maintenance you are willing to put in over the years!I agree with cordy - no rhizome barrier is needed with clump-formers such as Fargesia or Thamnocalamus. However the clumps will expand and will need to be kept in check over time.

Ph. nigra is nice looking and very hardy - and it may even lull you into a false sense of security for a couple of years - staying in quite a tight clump. - but at some point it will take a stroll through your herbacious borders! Twice yearly checking and maintenance should stop that happening.

As mentioned .. F. robusta or scabrida would be good options .... for something a little shorted look at F. rufa. I have a 3 yr old rufa hedge which is currently around 6ft and counting....

If cost is not too much of an issue - look at some of the newer Borinda's ..... nice thick culms - often blue in the 1st year ..and clumping!

Best to mix varieties too .... if one form flowers - at least you won't loose the entire hedge.


Laz

User avatar
karl66
Posts: 2645
Joined: Mon Jul 11, 2011 6:39 pm
Location: halesowen. west midlands

Re: Bamboo.

Post by karl66 » Wed Oct 05, 2011 3:46 pm

Lazlo Woodbine wrote:It really depends how high you want the eventual hedge to be as to the varieties you should select.

Given max heights for bamboos are rarely acheived in the uk.

It really depends how much work/maintenance you are willing to put in over the years!I agree with cordy - no rhizome barrier is needed with clump-formers such as Fargesia or Thamnocalamus. However the clumps will expand and will need to be kept in check over time.

Ph. nigra is nice looking and very hardy - and it may even lull you into a false sense of security for a couple of years - staying in quite a tight clump. - but at some point it will take a stroll through your herbacious borders! Twice yearly checking and maintenance should stop that happening.

As mentioned .. F. robusta or scabrida would be good options .... for something a little shorted look at F. rufa. I have a 3 yr old rufa hedge which is currently around 6ft and counting....

If cost is not too much of an issue - look at some of the newer Borinda's ..... nice thick culms - often blue in the 1st year ..and clumping!

Best to mix varieties too .... if one form flowers - at least you won't loose the entire hedge.


Laz
Many thanks, i've today planted some 5ft & 6ft big pots of the following; 2 pots of Phyllostachys Aurea, 1 pot of Phyllostachys Vivax Aureocaulis, & 1 pot of Phyllostacchys Nigra. All pots were full to bursting!!. karl.

tropical Tom

Re: Bamboo.

Post by tropical Tom » Wed Oct 05, 2011 4:08 pm

Hi Karl, I went to Charlies store opposite Powys Castle (welshpool) on sunday, they have large bamboos, various types, the most expensive are 40 quid, speak to Anthony (manager) and he will knock 50% off icon_cheers I got a 12 foot high bamboo for 20 quid so if you want a few it would be worth the drive out icon_salut

User avatar
karl66
Posts: 2645
Joined: Mon Jul 11, 2011 6:39 pm
Location: halesowen. west midlands

Re: Bamboo.

Post by karl66 » Wed Oct 05, 2011 4:22 pm

tropical Tom wrote:Hi Karl, I went to Charlies store opposite Powys Castle (welshpool) on sunday, they have large bamboos, various types, the most expensive are 40 quid, speak to Anthony (manager) and he will knock 50% off icon_cheers I got a 12 foot high bamboo for 20 quid so if you want a few it would be worth the drive out icon_salut
Thanks m8. I paid £120 for the 4 big pots, not sure if there 10 or 15 litre pots, but theres plenty in them. Looking at them now i think if someone wants a dense hedge effect the Phyllostachys Aurea is probably the best bet, but for visual effect the black & yellow wide bamboo. karl.

cordyman

Re: Bamboo.

Post by cordyman » Wed Oct 05, 2011 5:39 pm

There all runners Karl !

cordyman

Re: Bamboo.

Post by cordyman » Wed Oct 05, 2011 5:40 pm

Lazlo i love borinda and was going to buy one but read they're not too hardy

User avatar
Adam D
Posts: 3574
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2009 10:47 pm
Location: Scotland

Re: Bamboo.

Post by Adam D » Wed Oct 05, 2011 5:48 pm

cordyman wrote:Lazlo i love borinda and was going to buy one but read they're not too hardy
There are now quite a few different ones available, see www.junglegiants.co.uk as they have a good selection.

I bought a Borinda macclureana KR5602 from them last spring and planted it out in April 2010. It was hit hard by the last winter and completely defoliated, but the culms have all put new leaves on this year and is looking pretty good now.

I put the defoliation down to being fairly recently planted and the extreme cold, a set of circumstances that should not really happen again.

Post Reply