What do you know about PODOCARPUS species?

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Yorkshire Kris
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What do you know about PODOCARPUS species?

Post by Yorkshire Kris » Mon Jan 20, 2014 10:54 pm

Looks an interesting tree to try. Any thoughts?

http://www.burncoose.co.uk/site/plants. ... 26page%3D5
Last edited by Yorkshire Kris on Wed Jan 22, 2014 4:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.


Conifers
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS henkellii?

Post by Conifers » Mon Jan 20, 2014 11:32 pm

South African species which has proved just as hardy as P.salignus in the last 3 winters
I'd not rely on that at all. South Africa is a lot warmer than southern Chile.

Facts:
Notable measured specimens of P. salignus in the UK & Eire Tree Register: 44
Notable measured specimens of P. henkellii in the UK & Eire Tree Register: 0


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Yorkshire Kris
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS henkellii?

Post by Yorkshire Kris » Tue Jan 21, 2014 7:00 am

Perhaps because it's a new introduction?


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Blairs
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS henkellii?

Post by Blairs » Tue Jan 21, 2014 9:30 am

Conifers wrote:
South African species which has proved just as hardy as P.salignus in the last 3 winters
I'd not rely on that at all. South Africa is a lot warmer than southern Chile.

Facts:
Notable measured specimens of P. salignus in the UK & Eire Tree Register: 44
Notable measured specimens of P. henkellii in the UK & Eire Tree Register: 0
I believe they are half hardy, with hardiness increasing with maturity say H3 to H4 in the RHS system. They are found high in the Drackensburg mountains which do see frosts and snow and high rainfall.


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Yorkshire Kris
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS henkellii?

Post by Yorkshire Kris » Tue Jan 21, 2014 8:27 pm

Probably not good enough for me , I need proper hardy trees as I don't fancy digging up a big tree in 10 years after a severe winter. (I know I intend on growing Eucs but they should be hardy)


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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS henkellii?

Post by Andy Martin » Tue Jan 21, 2014 8:50 pm

Daves Garden gives it a USDA rating of 9a which is a little too warm for my area so i'll keep mine in a pot until it reaches 10 metres tall :wink:


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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS henkellii?

Post by Conifers » Tue Jan 21, 2014 9:00 pm

Yorkshire Kris wrote:Perhaps because it's a new introduction?
Nope; coming from a former British colony, it'll have been introduced and tried lots of times.


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Blairs
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS henkellii?

Post by Blairs » Tue Jan 21, 2014 9:15 pm

Podocarpus salignus has long leaves most like henkelii but is hardy...perhaps that is better for the UK? Some Yew varieties look like Podocarpus - densiformus for example. Dwarf Golden Japanese Yew is variegated looking and is hardy: a local park has a large specimen, so is proven hardiness. Not sure if that fits your plan am just thinking out loud.


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Yorkshire Kris
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS henkellii?

Post by Yorkshire Kris » Tue Jan 21, 2014 9:18 pm

Blairs wrote:Podocarpus salignus has long leaves most like henkelii but is hardy...perhaps that is better for the UK? Some Yew varieties look like Podocarpus - densiformus for example. Dwarf Golden Japanese Yew is variegated looking and is hardy: a local park has a large specimen, so is proven hardiness. Not sure if that fits your plan am just thinking out loud.

Cheers, I'll check those out. (BTW Winter watch featured Scot Pines tonight)


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Blairs
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS henkellii?

Post by Blairs » Tue Jan 21, 2014 10:40 pm

Yorkshire Kris wrote:Cheers, I'll check those out. (BTW Winter watch featured Scot Pines tonight)
There are some really nice ones on the A9 around Aviemore, where the boggy soil has kept them really dwarf and compacted and a pleasant peridot colour: very different from the tall scraggly ones in say Breckland, Norfolk.

I have let 6 of them grow in my garden (self seeded form nearby woods). Plan is to cloud prune them one day to keep them compact.


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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS henkellii?

Post by Conifers » Wed Jan 22, 2014 12:00 am

Blairs wrote:Podocarpus salignus has long leaves most like henkelii but is hardy...perhaps that is better for the UK?
Yep, definitely; it's even hardy up here in Northumbs.

Another long-leaved podocarp to try is Podocarpus matudae from eastern Mexico, the northernmost origins in southeast Nuevo Leon (sometimes treated as Podocarpus matudae var. reichii) are far north enough to get quite cold in winter. Not as hardy as P. salignus, but should be a bit hardier than P. henkelii.


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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS henkellii?

Post by Conifers » Wed Jan 22, 2014 12:07 am

Blairs wrote:
Yorkshire Kris wrote:(BTW Winter watch featured Scot Pines tonight)
There are some really nice ones on the A9 around Aviemore, where the boggy soil has kept them really dwarf and compacted and a pleasant peridot colour.
Nice bog pine photo on wiki commons here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File ... forest.jpg


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Blairs
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS henkellii?

Post by Blairs » Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:51 am

Conifers wrote:
Blairs wrote:
Yorkshire Kris wrote:(BTW Winter watch featured Scot Pines tonight)
There are some really nice ones on the A9 around Aviemore, where the boggy soil has kept them really dwarf and compacted and a pleasant peridot colour.
Nice bog pine photo on wiki commons here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File ... forest.jpg

Almost - it looks like deer has stripped off all the lower branches which spoils the look. Deer fencing sops them at the road verges so the trees look much better as they have branches to the ground. They also tend to be dwarfed by the weather (it is at least 500m altitude up to 1300m). So a 10 year old tree might be 2 metre with me might take 40 years+ there.


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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS henkellii?

Post by Andy Martin » Wed Jan 22, 2014 4:39 pm

I will be trying out the Podocarpus Matudae which I recently acquired from Mark Fillan. Looks a nice plant which I will plant out next to Pinus Patula. I like everything Mexican :D
Podocarpus Matudae
IMG_2055.JPG


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Blairs
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS species?

Post by Blairs » Wed Jan 22, 2014 4:49 pm

Let us know how that comes on Andy.


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