What do you know about PODOCARPUS species?

samj
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS species?

Post by samj » Thu Jan 23, 2014 8:52 pm

My partner bought me a what I have always thought was a Podocarpus henkelli from Trevenna Cross 5 years ago but after reading this thread, im starting to think it might be a P.salignus. However, I've compared P.salignus and P.henkelli on google images and to me mine still looks like a henkelli. It would be good to be sure so i'll post a picture tomorrow.

If it is a Henkelli, I would say its fairly hardy as until last year mine was in a pot which was frozen solid in 2 of the recent winters.


Andy Martin
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS species?

Post by Andy Martin » Thu Jan 23, 2014 9:54 pm

I have Henkelii also which has much smaller leaves than Matudae. When I get a chance i'll post a pic of both together for comparison


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Troppoz
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS species?

Post by Troppoz » Fri Jan 24, 2014 5:37 am

We have a few native Podocarpus in Australia and I would imagine Tasmanian species like P. alpinus and P. lawrencii would be potentially hardy, as would many NZ species. Lovely trees and nice soft foliage and are a favourite tree of mine.

Here in the tropical north a relictual population of Podocarpus grayii was recently discovered on the Arnhem Land escarpment about 2 hours drive east. They are totally isolated and are separated from the nearest populations in Queensland by over 1000km. They are thought to be totally relictual from wetter times when central Australia was a rainforest millions of years ago, now they cling on in damp protected ravines completely surrounded by savannah and desert. Its almost up there with Wollemia nobilis in terms of being a survivor!
Sean


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Yorkshire Kris
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS species?

Post by Yorkshire Kris » Fri Jan 24, 2014 7:20 am

[quote="Troppoz"]We have a few native Podocarpus in Australia and I would imagine Tasmanian species like P. alpinus and P. lawrencii would be potentially hardy, as would many NZ species. Lovely trees and nice soft foliage and are a favourite tree of mine.

Here in the tropical north a relictual population of Podocarpus grayii was recently discovered on the Arnhem Land escarpment about 2 hours drive east. They are totally isolated and are separated from the nearest populations in Queensland by over 1000km. They are thought to be totally relictual from wetter times when central Australia was a rainforest millions of years ago, now they cling on in damp protected ravines completely surrounded by savannah and desert. Its almost up there with

Wollemia nobilis in terms of being a survivor![/
quote]
Brilliant anecdote, just another example of things are still to be discovered.


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Troppoz
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS species?

Post by Troppoz » Fri Jan 24, 2014 8:04 am

Kris just found this distribution map if you are interested, you can see the Northern Territory population I referred to as an outlier in the central northern part well away from the wet Queensland coast. The region is called Arnhem land after the homeland of the first Dutch to explore the region and contains Kakadu National Park where this species was discovered.

Its a very graceful and soft tree and I was fortunate in being given a cutting many years ago, it looked great as a potted specimen but I made the mistake of planting it out. Cutting grown plants tend not to have great root systems and sadly down in went in some severe weather and was no more. Ive never come across a plant from this population since but the Queensland form has been in cultivation for many years.

Another interesting anecdote about this plant is that it was incorrectly named. The woman it was named, Netta Gray, was a Podocarpus specialist from the US and it was named in her honour after her death I think. The thing is that latinised naming conventions for the feminine dictate that it should have been Podocarpus grayae, so the name was a bit controversial in certain circles apparently. I think there was a push to rename it but I dont know what became of that.

Anyway, yes, Podocarpus are definitely superb trees! icon_thumleft
Attachments
P. grayae.jpg
Podocarpus grayae distribution
P. grayae.jpg (5.5 KiB) Viewed 632 times
Kakadu.jpg
This is typical of the sort of protected gorge where they survived for millions of years.
Sean


samj
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS species?

Post by samj » Fri Jan 24, 2014 2:11 pm

Could anyone tell me if they think this is a P. henkelli or not? cheers

podocarpus 2.jpg
podocarpus 1.jpg


Conifers
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Re: What do you know about PODOCARPUS species?

Post by Conifers » Fri Jan 24, 2014 3:35 pm

Troppoz wrote: I would imagine Tasmanian species like P. alpinus and P. lawrencii would be potentially hardy, as would many NZ species.
Those are hardy in Britain, but not particularly special to look at, with leaves just 2 cm long or so. Rather like a slow-growing, short-leaved Yew (Taxus baccata).
samj wrote:Could anyone tell me if they think this is a P. henkelli or not? cheers
Yep, could well be, though Podocarpus are a tricky genus to identify so I'm not 100% sure.


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