New Year New Member

wugga
Posts: 13
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2012 7:05 am
Location: north wales

Re: New Year New Member

Post by wugga » Thu Jan 02, 2014 12:36 pm

Thanks once again for the warm welcome. I apologise for the lurking!

It must be very handy to have that kind of height in a greenhouse but somehow I don't think next door would be thrilled if I built mine up quite that high! To be honest the height is the main drawback I can see with the design of the Hartley greenhouse. Because it has effectively a 'curved' roof without tall sides from ground level to eaves height I am quite worried that any tall plants will have to be arranged down the middle of the greenhouse which might make moving around inside more awkward. I have also considered lowering the floor inside. In my polytunnel I dug down around a foot and lowered the floor in there and it made quite a big difference, so that might be a possibility.

The cyathea medullaris is one of mypalmshop's 60cm trunked offerings. Apart from a trunkless dealbata and a couple of plug plants of cooperi from Shady Plants in Ireland I have bought my tree ferns from mypalmshop. I have been impressed with the quality of their plants and they have got their packaging down to an art form! All the tree ferns are in the heated greenhouse. I have an electric fan heater and also a gas heater (we have quite a lot of power cuts hence the belt-and-braces!) with thermostats in their and am trying to keep the temperature above 6 degrees with plenty of ventilation when the weather permits. Do you think that will be OK for the cyathea?
Attachments
image.jpg
Cunninghamii


User avatar
Arlon Tishmarsh
Posts: 6950
Joined: Sun Feb 01, 2009 10:53 am
Location: Horizontal

Re: New Year New Member

Post by Arlon Tishmarsh » Thu Jan 02, 2014 1:20 pm

wugga wrote:and am trying to keep the temperature above 6 degrees with plenty of ventilation when the weather permits. Do you think that will be OK for the cyathea?
My two cooperi didn't brown off until -5 in the greenhouse (2yrs ago) , +6 will be a doddle. I overwinter them in the garage now.

If you're not infringing any planning laws, i wouldn't worry to much about building the greenhouse up a bit. You can't always live your life for other people. I'm sure there's things your neighbours do that you don't like , thats life. Digging down is ok if there's no risk of flooding or creating a sump / drain for all the surrounding water to run into when it rains.


User avatar
fern Rob
Posts: 4901
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2012 11:13 pm
Location: Nr Sheffield

Re: New Year New Member

Post by fern Rob » Thu Jan 02, 2014 4:10 pm

wugga wrote:Thanks once again for the warm welcome. I apologise for the lurking!

It must be very handy to have that kind of height in a greenhouse but somehow I don't think next door would be thrilled if I built mine up quite that high! To be honest the height is the main drawback I can see with the design of the Hartley greenhouse. Because it has effectively a 'curved' roof without tall sides from ground level to eaves height I am quite worried that any tall plants will have to be arranged down the middle of the greenhouse which might make moving around inside more awkward. I have also considered lowering the floor inside. In my polytunnel I dug down around a foot and lowered the floor in there and it made quite a big difference, so that might be a possibility.

The cyathea medullaris is one of mypalmshop's 60cm trunked offerings. Apart from a trunkless dealbata and a couple of plug plants of cooperi from Shady Plants in Ireland I have bought my tree ferns from mypalmshop. I have been impressed with the quality of their plants and they have got their packaging down to an art form! All the tree ferns are in the heated greenhouse. I have an electric fan heater and also a gas heater (we have quite a lot of power cuts hence the belt-and-braces!) with thermostats in their and am trying to keep the temperature above 6 degrees with plenty of ventilation when the weather permits. Do you think that will be OK for the cyathea?
I agree with you that My Palm shop package the plants well. Cyatheas don't want to freeze but C Cunninghamii doesn't want to dry out as they don't recover well, from experience. I think I may have saved my C Cunninghamii touch wood.
Rob
( Tree Fern hunter )


jungle jas
Posts: 1453
Joined: Thu Sep 15, 2011 8:58 pm
Location: Arthog, Gwynedd, North West Wales.

Re: New Year New Member

Post by jungle jas » Fri Jan 03, 2014 5:10 pm

Hi Charlotte, Welcome. icon_thumright Not many of us on this forum from North Wales. Wugga, isn't that the Welsh's favorite sport. :oops: Sorry. You're not a million miles from Crug Farm when you have some money burning a hole in your pocket. What winter low temperatures do you get where you are. icon_thumright
Ignorance is bliss. What I don't know, wont worry me!

Jas


wugga
Posts: 13
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2012 7:05 am
Location: north wales

Re: New Year New Member

Post by wugga » Fri Jan 03, 2014 10:33 pm

Hi Jas,

Diolch yn fawr for your welcome!

Wugga was the nickname for Woolley, my first pet sheep! (It's important to live up to those stereotypes of the Welsh!)

I see from your topic on the community forum you're getting quite the battering on the coast - hope you've got through tonight's high tide OK and fingers crossed for the morning. It's been very windy here for weeks now but luckily we're quite high up so no problems with flooding. It does get quite chilly here and we were snowed in for quite a while last year - I love snow but it was wearing a bit thin last year, even for me!
Attachments
image.jpg
That's my greenhouse under there!


jungle jas
Posts: 1453
Joined: Thu Sep 15, 2011 8:58 pm
Location: Arthog, Gwynedd, North West Wales.

Re: New Year New Member

Post by jungle jas » Sat Jan 04, 2014 8:58 am

Yes, you did get a lot of snow last year which lasted for a few days in your area, Luckily in the estuary at sea level it doesn't stay very long, although the tops always look beautiful for some time. I would think you are limited to what you can grow without protection. Keep up the good work. icon_thumright

No problem with tides now as the wind has dropped, just a normal high spring tide. icon_cheers Just as an afterthought I would keep the sheep jokes to yourself or everyone will think we all walk about in wellies! :lol: :lol: :lol: icon_thumright

As for stereotypes I agree entirely. I always think Yorkshire Kris does a good job with with his flat cap and whippet. :roll: icon_thumright
Ignorance is bliss. What I don't know, wont worry me!

Jas


User avatar
redsquirrel
Posts: 12169
Joined: Thu Feb 26, 2009 8:35 pm
Location: bristol
Contact:

Re: New Year New Member

Post by redsquirrel » Sat Jan 11, 2014 9:39 am

jungle jas wrote:Yes, you did get a lot of snow last year which lasted for a few days in your area, Luckily in the estuary at sea level it doesn't stay very long, although the tops always look beautiful for some time. I would think you are limited to what you can grow without protection. Keep up the good work. icon_thumright

No problem with tides now as the wind has dropped, just a normal high spring tide. icon_cheers Just as an afterthought I would keep the sheep jokes to yourself or everyone will think we all walk about in wellies! :lol: :lol: :lol: icon_thumright

As for stereotypes I agree entirely. I always think Yorkshire Kris does a good job with with his flat cap and whippet. :roll: icon_thumright
welcome Wugga, i like medularis too but have killed a few now due to my poor overwintering habits. as for the wellies, do you have the LR ones up there or are they the hardcore unmarked ones?
i find LRs give me much more garden time icon_thumleft icon_thumleft icon_thumleft
mars ROVER broken down. headgasket faillure


wugga
Posts: 13
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2012 7:05 am
Location: north wales

Re: New Year New Member

Post by wugga » Sat Jan 11, 2014 10:50 am

Hi Redsquirrel,

I always go for unmarked wellies as they're much cheaper - then customise afterwards with my crayons to prevent any confusion!


Post Reply